Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

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CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - T

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TACCA LEONTOPETALOIDES - Polynesian Arrowroot

TAHITI APPLE See Malay Apple

TAHITIAN CHESNUT - Inocarpus edulis

TAHITIAN LIME - Citrus latifolia

TAHITIAN QUINCE - Spondias cytherea

TAHITI

  • Welcome to Paradise: Trip to Tahiti. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 70-73

TALISIA OLIVIFORMIS - Cotopriz, Guayo
This native of Colombia is a small tree bearing a sweet, pleasant-tasting, jet-black fruit the size and shape of an olive.

TAMARIND

  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, pp 68-69
  • Tamarind (Tamarindus indica). By Brian Lievens. 1979 #3, pp 11-12
  • The Tamarind. By Burton E. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 221-250
  • The Tamarind: Recipes and Medicinal Remedies. By Burton E. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 293-295

TAMARILLO

  • A Journey to Vilcabamba the Sacred Valley of Ecuador. By Steven Spangler. 1981 #3, pp 14-17
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Growing Tamarillo for Fun and Money. By Mark Rodgers. 1986 #3, p 8
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72
  • Some Interesting Facts about Tamarillos - the Register 15 July 1981. 1983 #4, p 16
  • Symbiosis and Elaeagnus. By William T. Drysdale. 1976 #3, pp 8-9
  • The Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 268-290
  • Tree Tomato and Mango Hardiness. By Clell E. Bowman. 1976 #2, pp 10-11
  • Tree Tomato Recipes. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 302-309

TAMARINDUS INDICA - Tamarind
A large, storm, drought-resistant tree, native to Africa and South Asia. A Moderate growing legume popular in many tropical and subtropical areas as an ornamental and as a fruit producer. The fruit is a velvety, brownish red pod (2-8") with a brittle shell covering a thick, deep-brown sticky pulp with a few seeds embedded. It has a high sugar and acid content. The pulp is used to make a drink, is eaten fresh and is an ingredient of Worcestershire sauce. Flowers are edible; the seeds are generally boiled or fried. Propagated by seed, airlayer or grafting. See Tamarind

TAMPOI - Baccaurea griffithii

TANGERINE See Mandarins

TAPIOCA See Cassava

TARA VINE - Actinidia arguta

TARO - Colocasia esculenta

TARO, CHINESE - Alocasia cucullata

TARWI

  • Greening of the Future. Part I. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #2, pp 16-20, 25

TASTE

  • Give Rare Fruits Their Just Desserts. By John M. Riley. 1980 YB, pp 116-126

TAVOLA See Tropical Almond

TEA - Thea sinensis, Camellia sinensis

TEA AND COFFEE TYPE BEVERAGES

  • Coffee in California. By John M. Riley. 1976 #3, p 10
  • Growing Tea. By Peggy Winter. 1979 #4, pp 8-9
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

TEMPERATURES

  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6
  • Drought-resistant Fruits and Nuts for the Water-efficient Landscape. By Tom Del Hotal 1989 J, pp 8-19
  • Notes on Growing Fruits in a Hostile Environment. By Dwayne Klotz. 1984 #4, pp 11-14

TERMINALIA CATAPPA - Tropical Almond, Indian Almond
This large semi-deciduous tree from the Malay Peninsula is widely planted in tropical areas as a street tree, as the large leaves change from green to red to bronze before dropping. The 2" long, greenish or reddish, flattened and winged fruit has a thin oily seed that is edible raw or roasted. The bark, roots and leaves contain tannin and the fruit also yields a dye. See Tropical Almond

TERMINALIA FERDINANDIANA

  • Abstract: Terminalia ferdinandiana: a Source of Vitamin C. By Jennie C. Brand et al. 1982 YB, pp 66-67
  • Editor's Mailbag. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1989 #2, pp 31-32

THAILAND

  • Bits & Pieces. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #2, pp 26-27
  • Fruit Samples In Hong Kong and Bangkok, Thailand. By Louis Schlom. 1976 #3, pp 1-3

THAUMATOCOCCUS DANIELLI - Sweet Prayer, Katempfe
This West African plant has large, dark-green oval leaves on 2' stems. The light-purple flowers develop into red fruit that are 1500 times sweeter than sugar. It is being tested as a potential sweetener.

THEOBROMA BICOLOR - Bacae, Mocambo


THEOBROMA CACAO - Cocoa, Cocoa Tree
This small evergreen from Central America is grown throughout the wet, lowland tropics under the shade of taller trees and is the source of commercial cocoa and chocolate. The 8-12" long, yellow or red fruit has a white, mucilaginous, mildly sweet pulp which can be eaten and many flat seeds. The oil from the seeds is used in cosmetics and perfumes. Propagated by seed, cutting, air layering or grafting. See Cocoa

THEOBROMA GRANDIFLORUM - Cupu-assu

THEOBROMA MARIAE - Cacau Jacare

TI-ES FRUIT See Canistel

TIESSAS See Canistel

TIGER NUT - Cyperus esculentus

TITOKI

  • Research Corner Notes. By John Riley. 1984 #2, pp 26-27

TOMATILLO - Physalis ixocarpa

TOMATO, CANNIBAL - Solanum uporo

TOMATO ROSE - Rosa rugosa

TOMATO TREE - Cyphomandra betacea

TOMATO

  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72

TORONCHI - Carica toronchi

TOXINS

  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72

TRAGOPOGON PORRIFOLIUS - Salsify, Vegetable oyster, Oyster plant

TRANSPLANTING

  • Experiments, Successes and Failures. By John M. Riley. 1981 #4, p 11
  • New Products for Old Problems: Old Products, New Uses. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 25-26
  • Notes on Transplanting Cherimoya and Feijoa. By Washington McIntyre. 1970 #2, p 1
  • Planting and Starting Tropical Seeds, Transplanting to Final Location. By W.V. Jerris. 1988 #2, pp 11-13
  • Plastic Bags for Successful Transplanting. By Rick Parkhurst. 1976 #2, p 11
  • Removing Balled Tree from a Hole. By Clell E. Bowman. 1975 #2, p 14
  • The Paw Paw in Illinois. By Robert Kurle. 1982 YB, pp 32-35
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • Yes, You Can Transplant a Macadamia. By Gloria and Perry Lukacovic. 1989 #1, p 27

TRANSPORTING PLANT MATERIAL

  • Letter from Zaire. By Roy Danforth. 1986 #3, p 15

TRAVEL

  • CRFG Travel Possibilities. By Peggy Winter and Sharon Hull. 1979 #1, pp 24-25
  • Bits & Pieces. By Peggy Winter. 1989 #1, pp 33-34
  • Bits & Pieces: Australia Trip, Brazil Trip, By Peggy Winter. 1987 #3, pp 22-23
  • Bits & Pieces: Australia, Mexico, Madagascar. By Peggy Winter. 1988 #2, pp 23-24
  • Bits & Pieces: Mexico, Borneo, Madagascar. By Peggy Winter. 1988 #3, pp 20-21
  • Bits & Pieces: Florida Trip, Thailand. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #1, pp 25-26
  • Bits & Pieces: CRFG Trips. By Peggy Winter. 1987 #2, pp 26-27
  • Florida Meeting Trip. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #3, pp 16-17

TREE MELON See Papaya

TREE TOMATO See Tamarillo

TREE PLANTING

  • Planting Guide for Trees and Shrubs. By Pacific Tree Farms Nursery. 1987 YB, pp 6-7

TRIFOLIATE ORANGE - Poncirus trifoliata


TRIPHASIA TRIFOLIA - Limeberry
This spiny shrub from India is extremely ornamental because of its stiff, zig-zag branches, dark-green leaves and white, fragrant flowers and makes an excellent hedge. The fruit is a small red berry that tastes like a lime. Propagated by seed.

TRITICALE

  • Greening of the Future. Part I. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #2, pp 16-20, 25

TROPICAL ALMOND

  • Talisai: Terminalia catappa. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 45

TROPICAL APRICOT See Dovyalis

TROPICAL GUAVA See Guava

TUMBO See Passiflora

TUNA - Opuntia ficus-indica

TUPELO

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

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