Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

Seed Bank

Fruit Specialists (Q & A)

CRFG Member Nurseries and Fruit Sources

Tidbits of Info

 

CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - S

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SA-KE See Breadfruit

SACCHARUM OFFICINARUM See Sugar Cane


SALACCA EDULIS - Salak Palm
This small cluster palm, armed with thorns, is native to Java. Usually dioecious, some have been found to be monoecious. The fruit, spherical and covered with overlapping brown scales, is the size of a plum with a delicious white meat and one seed. It is eaten fresh or preserved. Propagated by seed.

SALMONBERRY - Rubus spectabilis

SAMBUCUS SPECIES See Elderberry

SAND CHERRY

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

SAN DIEGO ZOO

  • Bits & Pieces: By Peggy Winter. 1985 #3, p 28
  • California Rare or Common Fruit Growers. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #4, p 20
  • More to Come at the San Diego Zoo. 1986 #4, p 11
  • Progress Report: Tropical Fruit Planting, San Diego Zoo. 1979 #3, p 7
  • Rare Fruits at the San Diego Zoo. By Peggy M. Winter. 1978 #2, pp 7-8
  • Rare Plants Collection of the San Diego Zoo. By Ernie Chew and Bill Knerr. 1980 #3, pp 17-18
  • Section at the San Diego Zoo. By Phil Clark. 1984 #3, p 9

SAN DOMINGO APRICOT

  • Genus Garcinia: the Mangosteen and Related Species. By Ottis Warren Barrett. 1978 YB, pp 66-72

SANDORICUM KOETJAPE - Santol, Sentol
This medium-size tree (to 45') from Southeast Asia has trifoliate leaflets and greenish flowers. The fruit is a 2", slightly flattened sphere with a brownish-yellow, velvety tough rind. Inside are five segments of white translucent, juicy pulp that has a sub-acid flavor and adheres to the seed. Propagation by seed or airlayering. See Santol

SANSHO See Japanese Pepper Leaf

SANTOL

  • Fruits We Liked in Southeast Asia. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #3, pp 16-17
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, p 68
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1978 YB, pp 5-13

SAPODILLA

  • News from the Hills. By David Silber. 1988 #4, pp 5-7
  • Questions and Answers. By Richard D. Tkachuck. 1985 #2, pp 10-11
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1976 YB, pp 57-58
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1978 YB, pp 5-13

SAPOTA (Manilkara zapote, Pouteria sapota) See Sapodilla

SASSAFRAS ALBIDIUM See Sassafras

SASSAFRAS

  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, pp 44-45
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

SCALOCARPUM VIRIDE See Green Sapote

SCIONWOOD: SELECTING, STORAGE

  • Apple Trees and Scions Via: Covered Wagon, Pack Mule, Vacation Van. By Charles E. Estep, Sr. 1988 J, pp 49-56
  • Care of Hardwood Cuttings. By Dean Conrad. 1989 #1, pp 35-36
  • Gleanings: Scion Leaves Help; Rind Grafting; Kiwis; Making Lychee Fruit. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 21-24
  • Trials/Tribulations and Success: Growing Kiwi at Mar Vista. By Horace Whittaker. 1983 #3, pp 7-10

SCREW PINE See Pandanus

SEA GRAPE - Coccoloba uvifera

SEA BUCKTHORN

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
SEA GRAPE - Coccoloba uvifera SEA GRAPE
  • Wild Fruit the United States. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #2, pp 6-7

SEAWEED

  • Seaweed and Fruit Trees. By Nance F. North. 1972 YB, pp 19-27
  • Seaweed and the Garden. By Bargyla Rateaver. 1978 #1, pp 5-9

SECHIUM EDULE See Chayote

SEED STORAGE

  • Growing Rare Fruit from Seed. By John M. Riley. 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • Powdered Milk as a Desiccant. By James Harrington. 1978 #4, p 5

SEEDLINGS

  • Planting Seedlings of Tropical Fruit. By Walter V. Jerris. 1987 #3, pp 4-8
  • Variety? Alpha Beta. By Warren Fauth. 1988 #1, p 5

SEEDS

  • Growing Rare Fruit from Seed. By John M. Riley. 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • Idea Box: Growing in Containers; Germinating Seeds. By John F. Donan. 1985 #2, pp 20-21
  • Key to Plant and Seed Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 16-18
  • Letter from Zaire. By Roy Danforth and Paul Noren. 1987 #4, pp 20-24
  • Marketing Alternatives for San Diego Small Farmers. By Faustino N. Munoz. 1985 #3, pp 21-23
  • Old Style Seed Company. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1980 #2, p 15
  • Seed Gathering in the Hawaiian Islands. By Steven Spangler. 1976 YB, pp 1-21-126
  • Seed Characteristics Table. By John M. Riley. 1987 YB, pp 36-43
  • Some Seed Sowing Suggestions. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1974 YB, pp 251-267

SERVICEBERRY

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Wild Fruit the United States. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #2, pp 6-7

SESBAN

  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, p 45

SESBANIA GRANDIFLORA - Sesban, Sesnania, White Spinach
A native of the East Indies, this quick growing short-lived tree has thin branches and compound leaves. The flowers are large, white and showy. The fruit is a slender green pod up to 2'. The flowers, pods and leaves are edible raw or cooked. The leaves are often used as a diuretic and laxative. The bitter bark is used as a tonic. Naturalized in S. Florida and West Indies. See Sesban

SEVILLE ORANGE - Citrus aurantium

SHADDOCK - Citrus Maxima

SHEPHERDIA ARGENTEA See Buffalo Berry

SHISANDRA CHINENSE See Magnolia Vine

SIERRA PLUM

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Wild Fruit the United States. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #2, pp 6-7

SIMMONDSIA CALIFORNICA - Jojoba

SITE SELECTION

  • Kiwifruit: a Cost and Revenue Analysis. By Claude Sweet. 1978 YB, pp 14-56

SNAILS

  • Ale Kills Snails. By Jim Pederson 1981 #4, p 5
  • Giant African Snail Achatina Fulica in Florida. By H.A. Denmark and C. Poucher. 1971 YB, pp 120-125
  • Graft Sealer; Egg Shells for Snails. By Philip Cohen. 1982 #2, pp 4-5
  • On Snail Control. By T.W. Fisher. 1981 #2, p 17
  • Research Corner. By John M. Riley. 1984 #1, p 23
  • Selling Your Snails. By Melita Israel. 1988 #4, pp 46-47

SOIL AMENDMENTS

  • Coffee Grounds for Alkaline Soils. By Vergie Westlund. 1974 #3, pp 6-7
  • Grow Your Own Nitrogen. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #3, pp 10-13
  • Growing Rare Fruit From Seed. By John M. Riley. 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • Mycorrhizae: the Other Half of the Root System. By T.V. St.John. 1985 YB, pp 61-68
  • Nitrogen Requirements of Fruit and Nut Trees. 1989 YB, p 41
  • Seaweed and Fruit Trees. By Nance F. North. 1972 YB, pp 19-27
  • Seaweed and the Garden. By Bargyla Rateaver. 1978 #1, pp 5-9
  • Soil Fertility: Analysis and Interpretation. By Douglas F. Havens. 1987 YB, pp 13-17
  • Something for the Pot. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1973 #2, pp 11-12
  • Subtropicals on Heavy Soils. By Ken Nobbs. 1981 YB, pp 75-78

SOILS

  • Cultivating Rare Fruits in Riverside. By William T. Drysdale. 1976 #2, pp 6-9
  • Cultivation of Granadillas in South Africa. By Frans A. Kuhne. 1975 YB, pp 56-70
  • Fruits the Year Around. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #1, pp 1-4
  • Further Thoughts on Adjusting to Our Drier Climate. By E. Hager, R. Watts and A. Ramirez. 1989 #4, pp 14-21
  • Growing Bananas in the Hollywood Hills. By Steven Spangler. 1975 #4, pp 11-12
  • Growing Rare Fruit From Seed. By John M. Riley. 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • Growing Tea. By Peggy Winter. 1979 #4, pp 8-9
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Notes on Growing Tropical Fruits in Southeast Florida. By Claude D. Reese. 1977 YB, pp 15-17
  • Papaya. By Brian Lievens. 1979 #2, pp 10-12
  • Pineapple Guava. By Paul H. Thomson. 1984 YB, pp 28-31
  • Preliminary Observations on Growing Mangoes. By Pat C. Pendse. 1975 #2, pp 2-5
  • Soil Fertility: Analysis and Interpretation. By Douglas F. Havens. 1986 #1, pp 26-30; 1987 YB, pp 13-17
  • Something for the Pot. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1973 #2, pp 11-12
  • Subtropical Fruits and Nuts of Spain, Kenya and South Africa. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 #1, pp 6-13
  • Subtropicals on Heavy Soils. By Ken Nobbs. 1981 YB, pp 75-78
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, p 8
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • The Rose Apple. By Burton E. Fisch. 1976 YB, pp 1-04-105
  • The Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 268-290

SOLANACEAE

  • Abstract: 20th Anniversary Meeting: Solana: the Wild Ones. By John M. Riley. 1988 #4, pp 18-27
  • Cocona: Solanum hyporhodium. By Joseph L. Fennell. 1983 #4, pp 17-19
  • Solana News Letter. By John M. Riley. 1985 #1, p 24
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72
  • Solanum. 1983 #3, p 5
  • Wild Fruit of New Zealand. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #4, pp 9-10

SOLANUM AVICULARE - Kangaroo apple

SOLANUM BURBANKII - Sunberry

SOLANUM HIRSUTISSIMUM See Lulita

SOLANUM HYPORHODIUM See Cocona


SOLANUM INDICUM - White Sparrow
This small shrub, native to Southeast Asia, produces a whitish-green, edible berry that is used in curry. It grows well but requires protection from the cold.

SOLANUM MURICATUM See Pepino


SOLANUM QUITOENSE - Naranjilla
This small, perennial shrub, native to Ecuador, Peru and Colombia, must be protected from freezing temperatures and makes a good potted plant. It bears large heart-shaped leaves which are downy on both sides and downy violet flowers with white interiors. The 1½" hairy, orange fruit is tomato-shaped with green juicy pulp. Propagated by grafting. See Naranjilla
SOLANUM TOPIRU - Cocona
This is an herbaceous plant from South America. The small, orange, egg-shaped fruit has a subacid-to-sour pulp with many small seeds. When ripe, it is eaten as a tomato or, mixed with sugar, makes a thirst-quenching drink. See Cocona

SONCOYA

  • High Altitude Finds: Annona Purpurea; A. diversifolia and Pouteria viride. By Peggy Winter. 1986 #1, p 25

SORBUS ARIA - Chess Apple

SORBUS AUCAPARIA - Rowanberry See Sorbus Species

SORBUS DOMESTICA - Service Tree See Sorbus Species

SORBUS SPECIES

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

SOURSOP

  • Chromosome Numbers in the Annonaceae. By Wray M. Bowden. 1974 YB, pp 73-81
  • Guanabana in Redlands. By Donald R. Shasky. 1985 #3, p 32
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, pp 61-62

SOUTH AFRICAN CHERRY See Pappea capensis

SPANISH CHERRY - Mimusops elengi

SPANISH JOINTFUR See Melindjo

SPANISH LIME See Mamoncillo

SPANISH PLUM See Purple Mombin

SPINACH, NEW ZEALAND - Tetragonia tetragonioides

SPANISH

  • Grove Spanish. By Burt Fisch. 1982 #2, pp 16-18
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29

SPONDIAS CYTHEREA - Ambarella, Otaheite Apple
A smooth, gray bark; large deciduous tree from the South Pacific. Resistant to drought. Fruit is oval 1-3", with tough, orange-yellow skin, pale yellow, firm, juicy, nearly acid pulp. Has a large spiny seed. The fruit is eaten fresh or in jelly. Propagated by air layer, large cutting or shield budding. See Ambarella
SPONDIAS MOMBIN - Yellow Mombin, Hog Plum
This medium-sized, deciduous tree, native to tropical America, is similar to ambarella except the bark is rough. The yellow fruit is smaller, with soft, yellow, subacid pulp and one large seed. It usually ripens on the tree after the leaves have fallen. It is eaten fresh or used in jelly. Propagated by seed or cutting. See Yellow Mombin
SPONDIAS PURPUREA - Ciruela, Purple Mombin, Red Mombin, Spanish Plum
This medium-sized, deciduous tree, from tropical America, needs to be protected from frost. An important fruit in native markets, it is strangely shaped,when young, it follows the outline of the knobby seed; later, it becomes rounded but retains a lip which covers the apex of the large seed. The flesh is slightly more acid than the other spondias but is delicious when cooked. Propagated by seed or cutting. See Purple Mombin
SPONDIAS PINNATA - Ambra, Amra
A small tree from Southeast Asia with attractive feathery leaves. The 1½-2", yellow, egg-shaped fruit has an excellent flavor. The flesh is thin around the large seed.
SPONDIAS TUBEROSA - Imbu
This medium, deciduous tree, a tropical native of Northern Brazil, needs frost protection. The olive-sized, yellow fruit has a tough skin with soft, pleasant tasting flesh.

SPONGE GOURD - Luffa cylindrica

STAR APPLE See Caimito

STAR FRUIT See Carambola


STELECHOCARPUS BURAHOL - Kepel Apple, Keppel
This small tropical tree, a relative of the annonas, is native to Malaya and needs to be protected from frost. It has beautiful pink and wine-colored new growth. The apple sized fruit has a thick skin and juicy sweet pulp with a delicious aroma that many people believe affects body aroma.

STEMBERRY

  • Chrysophyllum magalesmontanum: the Stemberry. 1971 YB, p 60

STONE FRUIT

  • Selected Stone Fruits for the Bay Area. By Andrew Mariani. 1988 YB, pp 35-39
  • Stone Fruit and Grape Production. By David W. Ramming. 1978 YB, pp 74-77

STRAWBERRY

  • Bits & Pieces: Edible Landscape. By Peggy Winter. 1987 #3, pp 22-23
  • Tasty Strawberries. By Robert Chambers. 1985 #3, p 8

STRAWBERRY GUAVA

  • "They Told Me Not to Tell You.". By Eph Konigsberg. 1984 #4, pp 16-17
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Growing Rare Fruit Trees in Containers. By John M. Riley. 1972 YB, pp 29-39
  • Preparing the Fruit We Grow. By Jo Davis. 1982 #4, p 24
  • Rare Fruit at UC Santa Cruz. By Kermit Carter. 1972 YB, p 112
  • Rare Fruits for the Water-saving Garden. By Alice Ramirez. 1988 J, pp 39-44

STRAWBERRY TREE

  • Additional Comments on Arbutus unedo. By Paul H. Thomson. 1974 #1, p 4
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Strawberry Tree. By Andrew P. Werner. 1974 #1, pp 2-3
  • The Strawberry Tree and the Madrone. By Melita Israel. 1976 YB, pp 84-88
  • What? a Rare Fruit Gal in a Mobile Home Space? Yes! By Cay Hillegas. 1983 #4, pp 21-23

STRYCHNOS SPINOSA See Kaffir Orange

SUGAR CANE

  • Down Under. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 22-31
  • Know Your Microclimate. By Mary Frances Stewart. 1972 #1, pp 8-9

SUGAR SUBSTITUTES

  • Alternative Sweeteners. By Carl Mehl. 1981 #4, p 24
  • Day with Bill Whitman. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, p 8
  • Greening of the Future. Part II. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #3, pp 15-16
  • Sweet Prayer Plant. By Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #3, p 4

SUKU See Breadfruit

SUMACS

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

SURINAM CHERRY

  • California's Only Pitanga Plantation. By Nelson E. Westree. 1971 YB, pp 9-13
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Pitanga: Surinam Cherry. By John M. Riley. 1971 YB, pp 14-25
  • Recipe: Pitanga Tea. 1971 YB, pp 117-118
  • The Pitanga: Home Use and Potential Commercial Applications. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #1, pp 5-9

SUSUNG CALABO See Elaeagnus

SWEET BAY See Bay Trees

SWEET LIME - Citrus limettiodiodes

SWEET ORANGE See Orange

SWEET SCENTED CRAB APPLE - Malus coronaria

SWEETBERRY - Viburnum lentago

SWEETSOP

  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, p 53

SWISS CHEESE PLANT See Ceriman


SYNSEPALUM DULCIFICUM - Miracle Fruit
This small, tropical, African shrub or tree requires acid soil. Needs lots of water and some shade. It adapts well as a container plant. The small bright-red fruit is sweet with a mild and pleasant after-taste. It has the unique ability to change the taste buds so that, for an hour or more after eating it, everything sour or bitter will taste sweet. It is propagated by seed or cutting under mist. See Miracle Fruit
SYZYGIUM AQUEM - Water Apple
This small, Southeast Asian evergreen tree needs a protected area (freezes at 28°F). It has colorful white or pink flowers and a small, red fruit with crisp, sweet, white flesh containing one or more seeds. Propagated by seed or airlayer.
SYZYGIUM AROMATICUM - Clove
This handsome evergreen tree, native to the Moluccas but now cultivated in many areas of the tropics, must be protected from temperatures below 40°F. The "cloves" used in food are well dried, unopened flower buds. Propagated by seed or air layer, with some success under mist.
SYZYGIUM CUMINII - Jambolan Plum, Java Plum, Jambu
This medium-to-large evergreen tree from Southeast Asia has glossy green leaves and white flowers. The ½-¾" long, purple fruit is astringent until ripe. It is used in jelly, juice and wine. Propagated by seed or grafting. See Jambolan

SYZYGIUM CURRANII See Lipote

SYZYGIUM FORTE - White Apple

SYZYGIUM GRANDE - Sea Apple


SYZYGIUM JAMBOS - Rose Apple
A medium evergreen tree, native to the East Indies. It is used as a shade tree in warmer areas (freezes at 25°F). The ornamental flowers are white with a shaving brush appearance. The 1½" long, egg-shaped fruit has a light-yellow skin with crisp, sweet and aromatic flesh and one or more loose seeds. Some say it tastes like rose water. It is eaten fresh, candied or in preserves. Propagated by seed or airlayer. See Rose Apple
SYZYGIUM JAVANICUM - Wax Jambu, Wax Apple
This medium evergreen, rapid-growing tree from the East Indies needs cold protection (freezes at 28°F). Its leaves are very long with white flowers that form in clusters. The red, waxy-looking, pear-shaped (to 1½") fruit has pure white flesh that is mildly sweet and watery. Propagated by seed, air layer and grafting.
SYZYGIUM MALACCENSE - Malay Apple, Tahiti Apple
This attractive evergreen tree, native to Southeast Asia, will stand temperatures to 32°F. It has large, dark-green glossy leaves and large (2") red-purple flowers set in clusters that appear tassel-like. The deep-red oval fruit has a thin skin and white crispy flesh with a sweet mild flavor. Propagated by seed or air layer. See Malay Apple
SYZYGIUM PANICULATUM - Brush Cherry
This evergreen shrub or tree, native to Australia, is adapted as a hedge in California and Florida and may be kept clipped. It will withstand several degrees of frost but doesn't like calcareous soil. The fragrant fruit is a rose-purple berry about ½-¾" across. It is sometimes used in jelly. See Brush Cherry

SYZYGIUM SAMARANGENSE - Java Apple See Makopa

SYZYGIUM SPECIES

  • Myrtaceae: the Family of the Guava. By John F. Donan. 1984 YB, pp 5-17

SYZYGIUM SUBORBICULARE - Lady Apple

SZECHUAN STRAWBERRY TREE - Cornus kousa


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