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1969-1989 Publications

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CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - R

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RABBITEYE BLUEBERRY

  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • For the Beginner: Suggestions for New Gardeners. By Phil Clark. 1985 #2, pp 6-9

RAINFALL

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Reaping the Benefits of Our Cold Wet Winter. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #2, p 24
  • Subtropical Fruits and Nuts of Spain, Kenya and South Africa. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 #1, pp 6-13

RAISIN TREE

  • Getting Raisin Trees to Sprout. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #4, p 14
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Japanese Raisin Tree. By John M. Riley. 1970 #2, pp 1-2; 1981 #4, pp 24-25
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

RAMBUTAN

  • Bits & Pieces: Australia, Mexico, By Peggy Winter. 1988 #2, pp 23-24
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1978 YB, pp 5-13
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45

RANDIA FORMOSA - Blackberry jam fruit, Raspberry jam fruit
This handsome shrub from tropical America is resistant to drought and has withstood 26°F without damage. The yellow, olive-sized fruit contains two cells with many small flat sticky seeds surrounded by sweet black pulp. Propagated by seed or cutting.

RARE FRUIT

  • 7th International Fruit Club Seminar. By David M. Guggenheim. 1989 #4, pp 3-10
  • A.K.A. Zapote. By Lois Fonseca 1989 J, pp 53-54
  • An Interesting Poster from Down Under. By Pat Sawyer. 1984 #4, p 9
  • And How Did You Get Started? By Tina and David Silber. 1989 #2, pp 11-12
  • Area News 1989, #3 pp 27-29
  • Book Review: Dictionary of Economic Plants. Reviewed by John Riley. 1983 #3, p 12
  • Book Review: Growing Unusual Fruits. 1981 #1, p 13
  • Book Review: Malaysian Fruits in Colour. Reviewed by Carol Frye Graham. 1982 #1, p 26
  • Book Review: The Complete Fruit Book. Reviewed by. Tito Steere. 1983 #4, p 24
  • Book Review: Tropical and Subtropical Fruits. Reviewed by Carol Frye Graham. 1982 #1, p 25
  • Book Review: Tropical Fruit with Sweet Flavor and Pleasant Aroma. Reviewed by Paul Thomson. 1978 #1, p 11
  • Book Review: Tropical Fruits. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 11
  • Book Review: You Can Grow Tropical Fruit Trees. Reviewed by Pat Houghton. 1984 #1, p 19
  • Brooklyn Botanical Garden. By T.K. Wang 1980 #1, p 14
  • Day with Bill Whitman. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 8-11
  • Down Under. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 22-31
  • Exotics: County's Hope for Top Dollar. By Frank Mickadeit. 1985 #3, pp 25-27
  • Follow-up to "A Study Of American Crops." 1989 #2, p 3
  • Freeze Damage Tropical Fruits in South Florida in 1977. By C.W. Campbell, R.J. Knight Jr., N.L. Zareski. 1979 YB, pp 50-55
  • Fruit Samples in Hong Kong and Bangkok, Thailand. By Louis Schlom. 1976 #3, pp 1-3
  • Fruits We Liked in Southeast Asia. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #3, pp 16-17
  • Give Rare Fruits Their Just Desserts. By John M. Riley. 1980 YB, pp 116-126
  • Growing Subtropical Fruits Down Under. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 #3, pp 20-24
  • Interesting Rare Fruits We Should Try. By Rosalie Osbaker. 1976 #2, p 12
  • Kauai Hai. By Don and Marlene Sanderson. 1989, #3 pp 12-14
  • Low Chill Fruits and Subtropicals. By Eunice Messner. 1989 YB, pp 12-16
  • Plants of Interest in Hawaii. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #3, pp 15-17
  • Plants That Shouldn't Be Thriving...But Are. By Peggy Winter. 1981 #1, p 14
  • Proposal for Standardizing Names of Fruits in the Philippines. By Roberto E. Coronel. 1982 YB, pp 76-79
  • Rare and Common Fruits: Conservation of Genetic Resources in Malaysia. By Bobby Tee. 1984 YB, pp 47-55
  • Rare Fruit Characteristics. By Claude Sweet. 1988 YB, pp 40-41
  • Rare Fruit in Colombia. By Catherine French Chaparro. 1976 #3, p 4
  • Rare Fruits at the San Diego Zoo. By Peggy M. Winter. 1978 #2, pp 7-8
  • Rare Plant Collection at the San Diego Zoo. By Ernie Chew and Bill Knerr. 1980 #3, pp 17-18
  • Reevaluating Cold Hardiness Certain Tropical Fruit Trees. By Henry Dawes. 1979 YB, pp 46-49
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1978 YB, pp 5-13
  • Some Needed Name Standards. By O.W. Barrett. 1982 YB, pp 80-83
  • Southeast Asia. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 21-22
  • What Constitutes a Rare Fruit? By Paul H. Thomson. 1969 #1, p 4
  • Wild Fruits of Australia. By John M. Riley. 1982 YB, pp 68-75

RARE FRUIT AND NUT LISTS

  • 1969 YB, pp 31-35
  • 1970 YB, pp 78-85
  • 1971 YB, pp 154-161
  • 1972 YB, pp 1-21-128
  • 1973 YB, pp 115-122
  • 1974 YB, pp 316-323
  • 1975 YB, pp 187-194
  • 1976 YB, pp 1-36-144
  • 1977 YB, pp 74-83
  • 1978 YB, pp 81-91
  • 1979 #4, pp 17-25; YB, pp 65-75
  • 1980 YB, pp 127-137
  • 1981 YB, pp 82-92
  • 1982 YB, pp 84-94
  • 1983 YB, pp 84-93
  • 1984 YB, pp 68-79
  • 1985 YB, pp 80-92
  • 1986 YB, pp 62-73
  • 1987 J, pp 64-76; YB, pp 110-125
  • 1988 YB, pp 50-59
  • Agroforestry in Zaire. By Roy M. Danforth. 1986 YB, pp 37-48
  • Fruit Common Names. 1988 YB, pp 60-63
  • Fruit FamilyGenus. 1988 YB, pp 63-34
  • Fruit List For Colder Area Experimenters. By Mark Albert. 1983 #4, pp 11-13
  • List of Members and Fruits Grown. 1975 YB, pp 195-210
  • Rare Fruit Council of Australia Common Names List. 1989 YB, pp 51-53
  • Rare Fruit for San Diego County. By Tom Del Hotal. 1987 J, pp 16-19
  • Name Changes. 1980 YB, pp 1-37-138
  • Recommended Fruit Trees for Frost Free Areas. By George Emerich. 1987 YB, pp 33-34
  • Recommended Fruit Trees for the Bay Area. By Brent Thompson. 1987 YB, pp 32-33
  • Rare Fruit Council, Australia Comprehensive Guide to Tropical and Subtropical Fruits. 1989 YB, pp 54-69
  • The CRFG Census A Proposal. By Richard D. Tkachuck. 1986 #2, pp 20-21

RASPBERRIES

  • Book Review: Raspberries and Blackberries: Breeding Diseases and Growth. Reviewed by Ron Kadish. 1988 #4, p 52
  • For the Beginner: Suggestions for New Gardeners. By Phil Clark. 1985 #2, pp 6-9
  • New Raspberry Called the Bababerry. By Louise Egan Steele. 1983 #4, p 15
  • Raspberries. Blackberries and Blueberries. By Bob Holzinger. 1989 J, pp 5-7

RATILES See Panama Berry

RECIPES

  • Acerola Comes to Calif. Loaded with Vitamin C. By Floyd L. Cooper. 1971 YB, pp 2-8
  • Apricot Walnut Candy. By Rose B. Blum. 1986 #2, p 22
  • Avocados Growing in San Jose; Guacamole Recipe. By J.W. Stephenson. 1984 #3, p 4
  • Babaco Salad. By Carmela Grossberger.1986 #1, p 18
  • Banana Blossoms: a Gourmet's Delight. By Robert E. Bond. 1988 J, pp 45-46
  • Banana. By Dianne M. Hand. 1988 J, pp 46-47
  • Betsy's Sapote Bread. By Betsy Young. 1983 #1, p 21
  • Bits & Pieces: Preserve Fruits. By Peggy Winter. 1986 #3, pp 20-21
  • Book Review: American Indian Food and Lore. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1977 #4, p 12
  • Book Review: Edible and Useful Plants of California. Reviewed by Paul Thomson. 1978 #1, p 10
  • Book Review: Preserving the Fruits of the Earth. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1977 #4, pp 11-12
  • Book Review: The World Guide to Cooking Fruits and Vegetables. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1977 #4, p 11
  • Book Review: Tropical Fruit Desserts. Reviewed by Pat Houghton. 1984 #1, p 19
  • Book Reviews: Food; Bananas; Cooking with Exotic Fruits and Vegetables. Reviewed by Eph Konigsberg. 1988 #1, pp 23-24
  • Brandied Fruit. By Barbara Bohb. 1971 YB, pp 107-109
  • Brandied Jujubes. By Albert Fei. 1971 YB, p 109
  • Candied Orange Peel. By Colette Weiss. 1986 #1, p 18
  • Cherimoya. 1983 YB, pp 41-43
  • Chocolate Cookie Fruit Pie. By Jean Lievens. 1981 #1, p 7
  • Citrus Family. By John M. Riley. 1979 YB, pp 17-27
  • Coconut. 1971 YB, pp 110-116
  • Easy Fruit Nut Bars; Hungarian Rice Bars. By Katherine Lee. 1988 #1, p 28
  • Fruit Delight. 1979 #1, p 31
  • Fruit Nectars. 1970 YB, pp 71-72
  • Fruit Pemmican. 1971 YB, pp 104-106
  • Fruit Pie. By Jean Lievens. 1981 #1, p 7
  • Fuyu Recipes, From Henry Avocado Corp. 1988 #2, pp 28-30
  • Give Rare Fruits Their Just Desserts. By John M. Riley. 1980 YB, pp 116-126
  • Guava. 1984 YB, pp 34-42
  • Guava. By Karl L. Smith. 1970 YB, pp 68-70
  • Guava Cake. By Elisabeth E. Smith. 1974 YB, p 292
  • Home Utilization of Carob Pods. By Edwin C. Pohle. 1974 #1, p 8
  • Jellies, Jams and Dried Fruit. By Wilbur G. Wood. 1973 YB, pp 105-107
  • Kiwi Jam Recipe. By Norman E. Sherman. 1978 #4, p 16
  • Lemon-glazed Persimmon Bars. By Evelyn Alberts. 1983 #1, p 20
  • Macadamia Nut. By Helen B. Thomson. 1970 YB, pp 67-68
  • Mango Pie. 1979 #1, p 31
  • Nosugar Jams and Jellies. Bill Chase. 1987 #1, p 19
  • No. Calif. Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: Uses of Persimmon Tree (recipes). 1987 J, pp 41-43
  • Passionfruit or Granadilla. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 165-178
  • Passionfruit Sugar Cookies. By Christina Jensen. 1983 #1, p 20
  • Pavlova, Ann Howells. 1982 #3, p 4
  • Persimmon Orange Delights. By Pat Sharpsteen. 1989 #1, pp 26-27
  • Persimmon Pudding; Bearss Lime; Quince Meat. By Melita Israel. 1988 #3, p 19
  • Persimmon Raisin Nut Cake. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #1, p 26
  • Pineapple Guava. 1970 YB, pp 70-71
  • Pitanga Tea. 1971 YB, pp 117-118
  • Preparing the Fruit We Grow. By Jo Davis. 1982 #4, p 24
  • Quince: Cydonia oblonga. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 YB, pp 50-69
  • Recipes Publications. By John M. Riley. 1972 YB, pp 1-05-106
  • Rose as a Fruit. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 YB, pp 7-13
  • Singapore Chicken Salad, Area News. 1989 #2, p 28
  • Some Interesting Facts About Tamarillos - the Register 7-15-1981. 1983 #4, p 16
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 44-49
  • The Paw Paw in Illinois. By Robert Kurle. 1974 YB, pp 191-192; 1982 YB, pp 34-35
  • The Tamarind: Recipes and Medicinal Remedies. By Burton E. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 293-295
  • The Versatile Breadfruit. By Donald Launer. 1988 #1, p 29
  • Things To Do With the Fuyu Persimmon. By John M. Riley. 1974 YB, pp 296-301
  • Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 302-309
  • Tropical Fruit - Rare and Exotic Fruits of Florida. By Paul H. Thomson. 1977 #2, pp 3-4
  • Tumbo - Avocado Salad. 1981 #1, p 19
  • Two Bay Trees (or three) What's the Difference? By Caroline Hoover. 1987 #2, p 29
  • Unusual Ideas for Unusual Plants. By Grace Johns. 1971 #1, pp 8-11
  • Zambo Colada. 1981 #1, p 19

RECORD KEEPING

  • CRFG Cooperation with Dave Wilson Nursery. By Robert Fitzpatrick. 1982 #1, pp 15-17
  • Necessity of Keeping Records. By Paul H. Thomson. 1974 #2, pp 8-9
  • Record Keeping for the Rare Fruit Grower. By David S. Roberts. 1979 #2, pp 7-8
  • Studying Your Own Microclimate. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #4, pp 13-14

RED BAY - Persea borbonia See Bay Trees

RED MOMBIN See Purple Mombin

RED STRAWBERRY GUAVA See Strawberry Guava


REYNOSIA SEPTENTRIONALIS - Darling plum, red ironwood
This shrub or small tree with leathery evergreen leaves is native to the Florida coast, from the Keys to St. Augustine and the Everglades to Ft. Myers. The wood is close-grained, very hard and used for cabinetwork. The dark purple, olive-sized fruit with a pointed tip is sweet and edible.

RHEEDIA

  • Genus Garcinia: The Mangosteen and Related Species. By Ottis Warren Barrett. 1978 YB, pp 66-72

RHEEDIA ARISTATA
A shrub or small tree from the West Indies, quite cold hardy (to 32°F). An extremely attractive ornamental resembling a holly, it has dark, glossy green leaves with a hard spiny tip. The small, yellow fruit has white, slightly sweet pulp with 1-2 large seeds. Propagated by seed.
RHEEDIA BRASILIENSIS - Bakupari, Pacura
This excellent landscape tree, native to Rio de Janeiro, is evergreen and slow growing. The plum-sized, sharply pointed, oval fruit has a tough orange skin surrounding white, translucent flesh of subacid flavor that contains two seeds. It is eaten fresh or in preserves and jams. Propagated by seed.
RHEEDIA LATERIFLORA - Wild mammee
This small evergreen tree from tropical America is the source of hard wax. The fruit varies in size from a plum to a small orange. It has a firm yellow rind and soft, white, sub-acid pulp with 1-2 seeds. Propagated by seed.
RHEEDIA MACROPHYLLA - Charichuela, Bacury-Pary
A small, slow-growing evergreen tree from South America. Fruit is small, yellow, with a firm, bumpy rind and a soft, white, subacid pulp with 1-2 seeds. It is eaten fresh. Propagated by seed.
RHEEDIA MADRUNO - Madrono
A small, handsome evergreen tree, native to Columbia and Panama, with fruit very similar to R. macrophylia. Propagated by seed.
RHODOMYRTUS TOMENTOSA - Downy Rosemyrtle
This excellent ornamental flowering shrub from tropical Asia can sustain slight freezes. It likes acid soil and a low water salinity. Fruit is round, small grape-size, greenish-purple and sweet. It is used in jams and pies or eaten fresh. Propagated by seed.

RHUS OVATA - Sugar bush

RHUS SPECIES See Sumacs

RHUS INTEGRIFOLIA - Sourberry

RIBES AMERICANUM - American Black Currant

RIBES GROSSULARIA - Gooseberry

RIBES RUBRUM - Red Currant

RIBES SATIVUM - Common Currant

RIMAS See Breadfruit

RINON See Rollinia

ROBUSTA COFFEE - Coffea canephora


ROLLINIA DELICIOSA - Biriba, Rinon
A medium-sized tree, native to the Amazon Basin and relative of the annonas. It is semi-deciduous and grows in sun or shade. When mature, it will stand 26-27°F. The large fruit is yellow with brown protuberances and has a yellowish-white, sweet juicy pulp with a good flavor. Propagated by seed. See Rollinia
ROLLINIA EMARGINATA
This subtropical shrub or small tree, native to Paraguay and Brazil, bears a close resemblance to other annonas. The fruit is the size of an apple with sweet pulp, melting like ice cream. Propagated by seed.
ROLLINIA MUCOSA, R. ORTHOPELALA, R. PULCHRINERVIS, R. SIEBERI
All of the above species are native to tropical America and have similar characteristics. The fruit is edible, resembling a sugar apple, but not as good. Propagated by seed.

ROLLINIA

  • Chromosome Numbers in the Annonaceae. By Wray M. Bowden. 1974 YB, pp 73-81
  • For the Collector Rollinia deliciosa. 1986 #2, p 15
  • Zambo colada. 1981 #1, p 19

ROOTCUTTINGS

  • 7th International Fruit Seminar (Florida). By David M. Guggenheim. 1989 #4, pp 3-10
  • Cherimoya Riddle. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 8-12

ROOTSTOCKS

  • Backyard Rootstock Trials. By Leo W. Manuel. 1983 #4, pp 9-11
  • Containerized Layering of Malus Rootstocks. By Richard H. Munson. 1982 YB, pp 50-54
  • Gleanings: Rootstock Problems. By Jim Neitzel. 1983 #2, pp 30-31
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • No. Calif. Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: Rootstocks for Persimmons. By Eugene Fowler. 1987 J, pp 39-40
  • Pistachio Update. By Ron Kadish. 1982 #3, pp 5-7
  • Rootstock Propagation: Your Choice. By Charles E. Estep, Sr. 1987 #2, pp 11-15

ROSA RUGOSA - Japanese Rose See Rose Hips

ROSE APPLE

  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • The Rose Apple. By Burton E. Fisch. 1976 YB, pp 1-00-111
  • Thoughts on Syzygium jambos (Eugenia jambos). By John Delevoryas. 1969 #2, p 2

ROSE HIPS

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Rose as a Fruit. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 YB, pp 7-13
  • Unusual Ideas for Unusual Plants. By Grace Johns. 1971 #1, pp 8-11

ROSELLE

  • Hibiscus sabdariffa (Roselle or Jamaica Sorrel). By J.C. Smith. 1979 #2, p 6
  • Roselle. John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 102-104

ROUGH LEMON - Citrus jambhiri

ROUGH SHELL MACADAMIA - Macadamia tetraphylia See Macadamia

ROUND KUMQUAT - Fortunella japonica

ROUNDLEAF SERVICEBERRY - Amelanchier sanquienea

ROWANBERRY - Sorbus aucuparia

RUBBER

  • Greening of the Future. Conclusion. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #4, pp 17-22
  • Guayule: Other Lesser Known Crops of High Potential Value. Jim Neitzel. 1981 #3, p 8

RUBUS CANADENSIS - Canadian Blackberry

RUBUS FLAGELLARIS - American Dewberry


RUBUS ILLECEBROSUS - Strawberry raspberry
A native of Japan is used mostly as a mat-forming ground cover to hold soil on banks. The small bright red fruit is generally cooked to make it palatable and can be used as a raspberry.
RUBUS NIVEUS - Mysore black raspberry
This sun-loving, semi-vining bush, native to India and W. China, is a vigorous grower that suckers badly. The leaves are dark green above and silvery green below. The blue-black droopy fruit, sweet and juicy, is eaten fresh or in jellies and juices. Propagated by suckers or tip layering.

RUBUS PARVIFOLIUS - Thimbleberry

RUBUS PHOENICOLASIUS See Wineberry


RUBUS ROSAEFOLIUS - Tropical Red Raspberry, Mauritius Raspberry
This native of Southeast Asia has downy stems with spines that curve backward and trail to 8' long. The 1" needlelike berry is red and juicy. Propagated by stem cutting and suckers.

RUBUS RUGOSUS See Keriberry

RUBUS SPECIES See Raspberries, Blackberries

RUBUS URSINUS cv YOUNG See Youngberry

RUBUS URSINUS - Boysenberry

RUKAM

  • Amaiit: Flacourtia rukam. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 37
  • Flacourtiaceae. By Marvin Darling. 1980 #2, pp 9-10

RUSSIA

  • In Search of Russian Kiwis. By Jim Gilbert. 1989 J, p 24

RYE / WHEAT HYBRID See Triticale


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