Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

Seed Bank

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CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - N

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NANKING CHERRY

  • Growing Rare Fruit in No. California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

NARANJA LIMA

  • Notes on Some Unusual Citrus Varieties. By Orton H. Englehart. 1971 #2, pp 4-6

NARANJILLA

  • Cocona Solanum Hyporhodium. By Joseph L. Fennell. 1983 #4, pp 17-19
  • How to Fruit the Naranjilla. By Norman E. Sherman. 1975 #2, pp 8-9
  • Nematodes in Naranjillos. By Ron Hurov. 1983 #3, p 6
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72

NATAL PLUM

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Rare Fruits for the Watersaving Garden. By Alice Ramirez. 1988 J, pp 39-44
  • The Carissa in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 YB, pp 73-81
  • What? a Rare Fruit Gal in a Mobile Home Space? Yes! By Cay Hillegas. 1983 #4, pp 21-23

NAUCLEA LATIFOLIA - Pin Cushion Tree
A straggling shrub or small tree, native to tropical Africa and Asia. It bears an interesting flower, a large red ball with long projecting stamens. The fruit is red, edible, but not appealing.
NAUCLEA ESCULENTA - Nauclea
This small evergreen tree, native to West Africa, is an attractive and unusual ornamental. It bears a medium-sized, red fruit with firm, sweet pulp and many fine seeds. Propagated by seed.

NECTARINE

  • Bare Root Time Again. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #1, pp 18-21
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Gleanings: Warm Winter; Need Evaluations. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #4, pp 18-19
  • Low Chill Fruits And Subtropicals. By Eunice Messner. 1989 YB, pp 12-16
  • Preliminary Apricot and PeachNectarine Comparisons. By David Guggenheim. 1986 #1, pp 22-24
  • Rare Fruits. But Not New. By C.T. Kennedy. 1985 YB, pp 40-51
  • Rating Deciduous Fruits. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick 1980 #2, pp 11-15

NEMATODES

  • Nematodes in the Garden. 1971 YB, pp 126-131
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72

NEPHELIUM LAPPACEUM - Rambutan
Indigenous to the Malayan archipelago, it is now cultivated in the tropical lowlands of Central America, the Philippines, and in parts of Australia. The tree is large and attractive, with a branched trunk and densely foliated with pinnate leaves. The 2" fruit, borne in terminal clusters of 10-12, resembles a chestnut burr in appearance. It is usually bright red when ripe, sometimes orange, with the skin covered with soft, fleshy spines. The flesh is white, adhering to a flattened seed, whose flavor varies from sweet to subacid. Propagated best by air layers or grafting. See Rambutan
NEPHELIUM MUTABILE - Pulasan
This large evergreen tree, native to Borneo and neighboring countries is a relative of the litchi. It is sometimes sold in markets as a variety of the rambutan, although it is actually a distinct species. The fruit is plum-sized, growing in clusters of 3 - 5, having a thick skin with deep pink, rough surfaces bearing short, blunt spines. The pulp is translucent white, adhering strongly to a large seed. The seed is also edible fresh or cooked. This tree hasn't fruited in Florida yet. Propagated by seed or airlayers. See Pulasan

NERVOSA See Canistel

NEW ZEALAND

  • A Tree of Many Uses. By Louis Trap. 1988 #1, pp 17-18
  • Gleanings: Article From New Zealand's Orchardist. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #3, pp 23-25
  • Growing Subtropical Fruits Down Under. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 #3, pp 20-24
  • Kiwifruit: a Cost and Revenue Analysis. By Claude Sweet. 1978 YB, pp 14-56
  • More on Other Macadamia Relatives. By Dick Endt. 1981 #3, p 11

NIPA PALM

  • Nipa: Nypa fruticans. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 42-43

NISPERO - Malilkara zapota


NORONHIA EMARGINATA - Madagascar Olive
A handsome shrub, from Madagascar, with light green oval, thick leaves. Salt tolerant, it does well in protected areas along the beach. The 1" round, purple fruit has a small amount of sweet pulp around a large seed.

NURSERIES

  • Apples for Low Chill Areas. By Frank James. 1989 YB, pp 6-8
  • Bare Root Time Again. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #1, pp 18-21
  • Commercial Sources of Fruit Trees. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1980 #2, p 14
  • CRFG Cooperation with Dave Wilson Nursery. By Robert Fitzpatrick. 1982 #1, pp 15-17
  • CRFG Member Nurseries. By Eunice Messner. 1988 YB, p 30; 1989 YB, pp 38-39
  • CRFG Trip to Hawaii. By Robert Chambers. 1982 #4, pp 10-14
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Foreign Nurseries for Tropical and Subtropical Fruits. By Eunice Messner. 1988 YB, p 29
  • Fruit Sources. By Eunice Messner. 1988 YB, p 31
  • Gleanings: Georgia Nursery. By Jim Neitzel. 1984 #1, pp 30-31
  • Gleanings: Native Persimmons. By Jim Neitzel. 1983 #4, pp 26-27
  • Helpful Sources. 1981 #2 p 22
  • Key to Plant and Seed Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 16-18
  • M & N Nursery. By Paul H. Thomson. 1974 #3, p 9
  • Nursery Report. By Ron Kadish. 1984 #1, p 22
  • Plant Material Sources. By Joseph W. Stephenson. 1971 #3, pp 14-15
  • Plant Sources Issue. 1973 #3, p 1
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Rare Fruits, But Not New. By C.T. Kennedy. 1985 YB, pp 40-51
  • Sources of Rare Fruits and Seeds. By I. Hartland. 1971 #3, p 16
  • Texas Persimmon. By John M. Riley. 1976 YB, pp 82-83
  • Tracking Down Foreign Suppliers of Rare Fruits. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #3, pp 2-3

NUTRITION

  • Actinidia: Wild-growing Plants As a Natural Source of Vitamin C. By E.I. Kolbasina. Translated by R. Meyer. 1989 J, pp 31-33
  • The American Papaw and Its Food Value. By C.F. Langworthy and A.D. Holmes. 1974 YB, pp 39-45
  • Bignay: Antidesma bunius, Euphorbiaceae. By Roberto E. Coronel. 1982 #1, pp 20-21
  • The Black Sapote. By Burton E. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 90-97
  • The Carissa in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 YB, p 80
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • Growing the Cavendish Banana. By Brian Lievens. 1982 YB, pp 59-62
  • Increasing Interest in Exotic Fruits. 1986 #4, p 5
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Nutrition and Pests. By Harry Foehner. 1975 #4, p 12
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • The Pitanga: Home Use and Potential Commercial Applications. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #1, p 6
  • Rose as a Fruit. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 YB, pp 7-13
  • The Rose Apple. By Burton E. Fisch. 1976 YB, pp 1-07-108
  • Tamarind (Tamarindus indica). By Brian Lievens. 1979 #3, pp 11-12
  • The Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 268-290

NUTS

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 97
  • Book Review: Edible Nuts of the World. Reviewed by Paul Thomson. 1978 #1,p 10
  • Editor's Mailbag. 1980 #4, pp 4-7
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Oyster Nut Telfaria Pedata. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #2, p 25
  • Plants of Interest in Hawaii. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #3, pp 15-17
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Scientific and Technical Literature. By MaryLouise Gurley. 1980 #4, p 11
  • Where Are the Northern Hickories Located? 1987 #3, p 12

NYPA FRUTICANS See Nipa Palm

NYSSA SPECIES See Tupelo


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