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Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

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CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - L

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LANDSCAPE USES

  • Drought-resistant Fruits and Nuts for the Water-efficient Landscape. By Tom Del Hotal. 1989 J, pp 8-19

LANGSAT

  • Book Review: Tropical Fruit with Sweet Flavor and Pleasant Aroma. Reviewed by Paul Thomson. 1978 #1, p 11
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, p 62

LANSIUM DOMESTICUM - Langsat, Duku, Lanzone
A medium-sized tree indigenous to the Malayan peninsula and the East Indies. The tree is erect and symmetrical. It is a slender tree with pinnate leaves composed of 5-7 leaflets 4-8 inches long. The small sub-sessile flowers are borne on racemes or spikes on the trunk or large branches. The fruits held in clusters are 1-2 inches in diameter, straw-colored, with a thick leathery skin enclosing segments of white translucent juicy aromatic flesh. The fruit is eaten fresh or cooked. The tree is tropical, not standing drought or cold. There are several varieties of langsat which are distinguishable by the fruit size and flavor. See Langsat

LAURUS NOBILIS See Bay Trees


LECYTHIS ZABUCAYO - Paradise Nut, Brazil Nut, Sapucia Nut
A family of large tropical trees bearing nuts similar to the Brazil nut, but smaller. The nuts are about 2" long by half as wide. They grow in large, hard, woody fruits which are shaped like urns with a lid. The tree is tropical and has rarely been grown successfully in the U.S.

LEMON

  • Lemons. By Joseph W. Stephenson. 1973 #1, pp 8-10

LEMONQUAT

  • Notes on the Kumquats. By Joseph W. Stephenson. 1971 #1, pp 2-5

LEUCAENA

  • Agroforestry in Zaire. By Roy M. Danforth. 1986 YB, pp 37-48
  • Greening of the Future. Conclusion. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #4, pp 17-22
  • Research Corner Notes. By John Riley. 1984 #2, pp 26-27

LICANIA PLATYPUS - Sunsapote
A spreading tropical lowlands tree with a dense canopy. The fruit is large, about 8 inches, oval-shaped, with tan-brown or grayish skin surrounding an orange-reddish fibrous sweet pulp containing one large seed. It is used fresh and is propagated by seeds but airlayers have been successful. It is grown in the warmer protected areas of South Florida.

LICORICE

  • Greening of the Future. Part II. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #3, pp 15-16

LILLY-PILLY TREE See Acmena smithii

LIMA See Naranja Lima

LIME

  • CRFG Kitchen: Bearass Lime. By Melita Israel. 1988, #3 p 19
  • Daylap: Citrus aurantifolia. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, pp 38-39
  • Notes on Growing Tropical Fruits in Southeast Florida. By Claude D. Reese. 1977 YB, pp 15-17
  • On Mulched Basins and Mexican Limes. By Washington McIntyre. 1972 #4, pp 8-9

LIME, OGEECHEE - Nyssa capitata

LIME, WILD - Citrus hystrix

LIMEBERRY - Triphasia trifolia

LIMEQUAT

  • Notes on the Kumquats. By Joseph W. Stephenson. 1971 #1, pp 2-5

LING NUT - Trapa bicornis

LINGARO See Elaeagnus

LIPOTE

  • Correction: Lipote is Not Under Genus Eugenia (Vol 17, p 8). By Roberto E. Coronel. 1985 YB, p 75
  • Lipote: Syzygium curraniiIgot. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, p 41
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1978 YB, pp 5-13

LITCHI CHINENSIS - Litchi, Lychee
An evergreen tree originating from China. Slow growing, but reaching heights of 35'. It has attractive pinnate leaves of a shining leather texture. The fruit, when ripe, has dark red-brown and rough skin, is 1 to 1½" long and grows in bunches. Under the brittle skin, the flesh is pearly white, sweet and jelly-like, though firm. It is eaten fresh or sun-dried (Litchi Nuts) or canned in syrup. It is a good source of vitamin C and phosphorous. Propagated by airlayering or grafting. See Lychee

LONGAN

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 95
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Fruiting the Longan in Northern California By John Delevoryas. 1975 #2, p 9
  • Fruits We Liked in Southeast Asia. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #3, pp 16-17
  • Growing Blueberries, Cherries, Cherimoyas, Longans, Apples in Thousand Oaks. By Robert F. Vieth. 1978 #4, pp 6-7
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Inarching Varietal Lychee on Longan Seedling. By Louis Lopyan, M.D. 1989, #3 pp 15-16
  • Miscellaneous Musings of a Misgiving Miscreant. By John Delevoryas. 1972 #2, pp 1-3
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45
  • Varieties of Longan that have Borne Fruit. By Paul H. Thomson. 1970 #1, p 2

LOQUAT

  • 1985 is the Year of The Loquat. By Eph Konigsberg. 1985 #1, p 26
  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, pp 94-95
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Fruits Recommended by Specialists. 1989 YB, pp 34-35
  • Further Thoughts on Adjusting to Our Drier Climate. By E. Hager, R. Watts and A. Ramirez. 1989 #4, pp 14-21
  • Gleanings: Loquats. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #4, pp 18-19
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Hedging with the Loquat. By Pat Weissleader. 1985 YB, pp 33-34
  • Loquat and Other Rosaceae Recipes. By John Donan, Dianne Hand, Pat Houghton. 1985 YB, pp 35-39
  • Loquat. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #2, pp 7-14
  • Loquats: a Literature Search. By Pat Sawyer, Pat Houghton, Leo Manuel. 1985 YB, pp 23-33
  • Rare Fruit at UC Santa Cruz. By Kermit Carter. 1972 YB, p 112
  • What? a Rare Fruit Gal in a Mobile Home Space? Yes! By Cay Hillegas. 1983 #4, pp 21-23
  • Yes Virginia, the Loquat is a Member of the Rose Family. By John F. Donan. 1985 YB, pp 1-22

LOW CHILL

  • Apples for a Mild Climate. By Wilbur G. Wood. 1978 YB, pp 1-2
  • Apples for Low Chill Areas. By Frank James. 1989 YB, pp 6-8
  • Deciduous Fruittree Varieties for Low Chill Areas. By Bob Fitzpatrick. 1988 YB, p 23
  • Gleanings: Low Chill Apples, Pears, Apricots, Plums. By Jim Neitzel. 1985 #3, pp 24-25
  • Gleanings: Low Chill Pears and Apples; Grafting; By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #2, pp 14-15
  • Gleanings: Low Chill Pears. By Jim Neitzel. 1983 #4, pp 26-27
  • Looking for a Low Chill, Late Peach. By Frank James. 1986 #2, pp 13-14
  • Low Chill Fruits and Subtropicals. By Eunice Messner. 1989 YB, pp 12-16
  • Low Chilling Apple Varieties. By John Bregger. 1973 #2, p 4
  • Low-chill Actinidias - an '89 Update. By Roger Meyer. 1989 J, pp 22-24
  • Over Emphasis On Low Chill??? By Charles E. Estep, Sr.. 1988 #1, pp 6-10

LOVE-IN-THE-MIST - Passiflora foetida

LOVI-LOVI - Flacourtia intermis

LUCUMA See Canistel

LUFFA CYLINDRICA - Sponge gourd

LULITA

  • Cocona Solanum hyporhodium. By Joseph L. Fennell. 1983 #4, pp 17-19

LUMA APICULATA

  • Two Exotic Suggestions. Luma apiculata; Debregesia edulis. By John M. Riley. 1982 #4, pp 5-7

LYCHEE

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 95
  • Avoiding Lychee Leaf Burn. By Bill Scott. 1988 #1, p 31
  • Bits & Pieces: Litchis. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #3, p 28
  • Confusion in Identifying Lychee Varieties. By Edward T. Fukunaga. 1970 #1, p 2
  • From the Mailbag. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #1, pp 15-16
  • Gleanings: Making Lychees Fruit. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 21-24
  • Inarching Varietal Lychee on Longan Seedling. By Louis Lopyan, M.D.. 1989, #3 pp 15-16
  • Lychee Cultivar Names. By B.J. Watson. 1984 #1, pp 13-18
  • Lychees are very Susceptible to Damage from Weed Oil. By Farwell. 1969 #3, p 2
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, pp 62-63
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45
  • The Lychee. By Richard D. Langdon. 1969 YB, pp 1-8

LYCIUM CHINENSIS - Matrimony vine

LYCOPERSICON See Tomato

LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM - Purple calabash-tomato


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