Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

Seed Bank

Fruit Specialists (Q & A)

CRFG Member Nurseries and Fruit Sources

Tidbits of Info

 

CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - F

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FAIRS AND SHOWS

  • Another CRFG Fair Success. By Cal Bream. 1980 #4, pp 11-12
  • County Fair Report. By Clarence Barker. 1981 #4, p 25
  • CRFG at the Fair: Del Mar and Orange County. 1980 #3, pp 20-21
  • Ingenuity at Work. By Pat Sawyer. 1985 #4, p 32
  • No. California Participates in San Francisco Landscape Show. By Florence Strange. 1986 #3, pp 25-26

FALSE KAMI See Tropical Almond

FARKLEBERRY

  • Farkleberries as Rootstock for Blueberries. By Floyd Blount Jr. 1976 YB, pp 70-72

FARM ADVISORS

  • Farm Advisors Offer Excellent Programs. 1985 #2, p 27
  • Marketing Alternatives for San Diego Small Farmers. By Faustino N. Munoz. 1985 #3, pp 21-23

FARMERS' MARKETS

  • Subtropicals and Farmers' Markets: a Natural Match. By Mark Wall. 1987 #2, pp 7-9
  • Kauai Hai. By Don and Marlene Sanderson. 1989, #3 pp 12-14

FEIJOA SELLOWIANA - Feijoa, Pineapple Guava
This evergreen shrub or small tree from South America is a useful landscape ornamental with its showy flowers and grey-green leaves. It is hardy and withstands 14°F. The fruit has green skin covered with white powder, is oblong to 3" and has sweet/acid white pulp. It should be harvested immediately after it falls. (Holding out your hand is the "tongue-in-cheek" recommended method.) It is eaten fresh, makes a good jelly or the pureed pulp dries to a flavorful leather. See Feijoa

FEIJOA

  • Death of a Feijoa. By Richard D. Tkachuck. 1985 #3, p 29
  • Feijoa Cultivation Expands in California. By J.F. Swift. 1984 YB, pp 44-46
  • Feijoa in Central California. By Clell E. Bowman. 1974 #4, pp 11-12; 1984 YB, pp 32-33
  • Feijoa Cultivars. 1982 #3, p 27
  • Feijoa Recipes. 1984 YB, pp 34-43
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Growing Subtropical Fruits Down Under. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 #3, pp 20-24
  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, pp 46-47
  • Jellies, Jams and Dried Fruit. By Wilbur G. Wood. 1973 YB, pp 105-107
  • Landscaping with Rare Fruits. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #2, pp 1-4
  • Pineapple Guava. By Paul H. Thomson. 1970 #2, pp 2-4; 1984 YB, pp 28-31
  • Pineapple Guavas. By Aida Pauletich. 1983 #1, p 4
  • Rare Fruits for the Watersaving Garden. By Alice Ramirez. 1988 J, pp 39-44
  • Transplanting Cherimoya and Feijoa. By Washington McIntyre. 1970 #2, p 1

FERTILIZATION

  • Adapting Apples to the Tropics. By Voon Boon Hoe. 1983 #4, pp 28-32
  • Cherimoya Riddle. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 8-12
  • Citrus Rating. By Bob Fitzpatrick. 1981 #2 p 20
  • Container Culture. By William L. Nelson. 1982 YB, pp 47-49
  • Cultural Nuggets for Would-be Apple Growers. Talk by J. Rider. Reported by Melita Israel. 1989 #2, pp 16-19
  • Fertilization. By Leah Anne Cornish and D.W. Donahoo. 1987 YB, pp 12-13
  • Fertilizer; Master Gardeners Training Program. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #2, p 3
  • Gleanings: Articles from Magazines. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #3, p 23
  • Grow Your Own Nitrogen. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #3, pp 10-13
  • Growing Rare Fruit from Seed. By John M. Riley. 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • Tea. By Peggy Winter. 1979 #4, pp 8-9
  • Introducing the Actinidia. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1989 J, pp 20-21
  • Is Nitrogen Fertilizer All That's Needed? By Dwayne Klotz. 1988 #2, p 10
  • Letter on Papaya Culture. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1978 #2, pp 2-3
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Nitrogen Requirements of Fruit and Nut Trees. 1989 YB, p 41
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Seaweed and Fruit Trees. By Nance F. North. 1972 YB, pp 19-27
  • Seaweed and the Garden. By Bargyla Rateaver. 1978 #1, pp 5-9
  • Soil Fertility: Analysis and Interpretation. By Douglas F. Havens. 1986 #1, pp 26-30
  • Tamarind: Tamarindus indica. By Brian Lievens. 1979 #3, pp 11-12
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51

FICUS AWKEOTSANG - Chia Ye, Chinese Jello
A vine that bears a yellow fruit used by the Chinese for making a "Jello"-like jelly.

FICUS CARICA See Fig

FICUS HISPIDA - Tropical Fig


FICUS PSEUDAPALMA - Palm-like Fig, Philippine Fig, Philippine Palm
The poor quality fruit of this plant is edible but not palatable. Young tender leaves are cooked with butter and eaten like spinach.

FICUS PSEUDAPALMA

  • Bits & Pieces. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #1, pp 25-26
  • Meeting Florida Fruit Growers. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 18-19

FIELD TRIPS

  • A Visit to the Fetzer Winery. By Florence Strange. 1989 #4, p 11
  • CRFG Visits a Tissue Culture Lab. By David Kier. 1986 #3, p 19
  • October 24th Tour. By Peggy Winter. 1981 #1, p 23

FIG

  • A Novel Shape for a Fig. By Peggy Winter. 1982 #1, p 11
  • Comments on This and That. By William T. Drysdale. 1975 #3, pp 14-16
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Fig Recommendations for Los Angeles. By Alan Leslie. 1972 #4, p 4
  • Figs: Fruiting Results 1987. By Walter V. Jerris. 1988 #1, pp 15-16
  • Further Thoughts on Adjusting to Our Drier Climate. By E. Hager, R. Watts and A. Ramirez. 1989 #4, pp 14-21
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Jurupa Mountains Cultural Center: Lesson in Beauty and Destruction. By Marianne Friedman. 1987 #3, p 24
  • Matter of Origin. By Paul H. Thomson. 1972 #2, pp 11-12
  • Notes on Three Fruits, Hardly Rare. By Ira J. Condit. 1972 #2, pg 911
  • Portrait of a Fig Farmer. By Marianne Friedman. 1987 #2, pp 5-6
  • Preserving Figs. By Beth Nichols. 1985 #4, p 16
  • Rare Fruit at UC Santa Cruz. By Kermit Carter. 1972 YB, p 112
  • Ruby Law's Fig Paradise. By Marianne Friedman. 1987 #1, pp 11-12
  • Start Your Own Figs: a Good Propagation Experience for the Beginner. By George F. Emerich. 1986 #1, pp 16-17
  • The Fig: Its Rise, Decline and Renaissance. By George E. Herrera Sr.. 1982 YB, pp 55-58

FIJI LONGAN - Pometia pinnata

FILBERT - Corylus avellana

FINANCES

  • 1974 Financial Statement. 1974 YB, p 3
  • 1975 Financial Statement. 1975 YB, p 3
  • Treasurer's Report. By Claire A. Guggenheim. 1988 YB, pp 46-48; 1989 YB, pp 45-47

FINGER LIME

  • Growing Rare Fruit Trees in Containers. By John M. Riley. 1972 YB, pp 29-39

FIRE DAMAGE

  • Burned Plants Sprouting from Rootstock; Polytrap Frost Protection. By Steve Ashley. 1980 #1, p 15

FLACOURTIA DATAPHRACTA - Paniala
A shrub or small tree from India and Malaya, this dioecious plant is thorny but a good landscape ornamental and will tolerate drought conditions. The fruit is a round, dark-red berry, eaten fresh or in jellies.
FLACOURTIA INDICA - Governor's Plum, Ramontchi, Madagascar Plum. Batoko Plum
Dioecious. This shrub or small tree from Madagascar and South Asia freezes around 25°F. Needs little cultural care except pruning to keep it shapely. Fruit is round, smooth, about ½"-1"across, dark red to black with a sweet juicy pulp surrounding several small flat seeds. Because of its high iron content, drinks turn brown in sunlight. The fruit is also eaten fresh or made into jelly. See Governor's Plum
FLACOURTIA INERMIS - Lori-Lori, Koorkup
This small tree, a native of Malaysia, with lovely bright green leaves makes a good ornamental. It is grown in Moluccas for the fruit. The fruit is a reddish berry, the size of a cherry, with acidic flavor and used more for pies and jellies.
FLACOURTIA RUKAM - Rukam, Indian Prune
A shrub or small tree from the Philippines and Malaysia. It has spiny branches and trunk with the largest leaves of all Flacourtia. Fruit is juicy, dark purple when ripe. The tree is hardy and tolerant of poor soils, but cannot be recommended for home use because of the spines. See Rukam

FLACOURTIA SEPIARIA - Sepiaria

FLORIDA ARROWROOT - Zamia integrifolia

FLORIDA CHERRY See Surinam Cherry

FLORIDA

  • 7th International Fruit Club Seminar. By David M. Guggenheim. 1989, #4 pp 3-10
  • Abstract: 20th Anniversary Meeting: Fruit and Spice Park in So. Florida. By Chris B. Rollins. 1988 #4, pp 30-32
  • Abstract: 20th Anniv. Meeting: Living Off the Land, Marian Van Atta. 1988 #4, p 27
  • Day with Bill Whitman. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 8-11
  • Farthest North Paw Paw. By Ernestine Lamouraux. 1977 #1, pp 18-20
  • Freeze Damage Tropical Fruits in South Florida in 1977. By C.W. Campbell, R.J. Knight Jr., N.L. Zareski. 1979 YB, pp 50-55
  • Mamey Sapote in Florida. By William F. Whitman. 1973 YB, pp 35-38
  • Meeting Florida Fruit Growers. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 18-19
  • New Sources of Cold Hardiness for Citrus Breeding. By R. Young, C. Barrett, C.J. Hearn, D. Hutchinson. 1983 #3, p 25
  • Notes on Growing Tropical Fruits in Southeast Florida. By Claude D. Reese. 1977 YB, pp 15-17
  • Oriental Persimmons in Florida. By Harold N. Acrivos. 1987 J, pp 23-24
  • The Anna Apple in Florida. By Robert S. Hardwick. 1978 #4, pp 7-8
  • Update on Mango Growing. By Jerry Staedeli. 1983, #2, p 14
  • Visit with Bob and Opal Smith. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #2, pp 19-20

FORTUNELLA JAPONICA - Round Kumquat, Marumi Kumquat


FORTUNELLA MARGARITA - Nagami Kumquat
The fruit is small, oval with a few seeds and is slightly tart. It is generally used in preserves, decorations or can be eaten whole and will hold on the tree for months. The tree is small, fine-stemmed, with few or no thorns and dense foliage. It also makes a container plant. They can and do have several bloom periods, giving the opportunity to have fruit during a number of the months in the year. Propagated by budding. See Kumquat
FORTUNELLA MARGARITA X JAPONICA - Meiwa Kumquat
The fruits of this tree are round. 1½" across, with sweet rind and almost juiceless pulp. They also can be eaten whole. See Kumquat

FOUR-ANGLED BEAN See Winged Bean

FRAGARIA SPECIES See Strawberry

FRAGRANT GRANADILLA - Passiflora alata

FREYCINETIA BANKSII

  • Wild Fruit of New Zealand. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #4, pp 9-10

FROST PROTECTION

  • Area News 1989, #3 pp 27-29
  • Avocados for Cold Climates. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1988 #4, pp 42-43
  • Backyard Frost Protection. By David Silber. 1988 J, pp 14-16
  • Bits & Pieces: Southern California Freeze. By Peggy Winter. 1987 #2, pp 26-27
  • Burned Plants Sprouting from Rootstock; Polytrap Frost Protection. By Steve Ashley. 1980 #1, p 15
  • Climate Modification to Increase Heat. By Louis Lopyan. 1984 #4, pp 24-26
  • Cold Protection with Light; Tropical Fruit Research. 1983 #1, pp 16-17
  • Combatting Frost. By William T. Drysdale. 1971 YB, pp 51-60
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Evaluating Freeze Damage. By Walter V. Jerris. 1987 #2, pp 19-21
  • Experiments, Successes and Failures. By John M. Riley. 1981 #4, p 11
  • Freeze Damage Tropical Fruits in South Florida in 1977. By C.W. Campbell, R.J. Knight Jr., N.L. Zareski. 1979 YB, pp 50-55
  • From the Mailbag. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #1, pp 15-16
  • Frost Control "Wiltpruf". By William T. Drysdale. 1972 #4, pp 5-6
  • Frost Protection for Tropical Fruit Trees. By Pat C. Pendse. 1975 #4, pp 9-11
  • Frost Protection. By Rick Parkhurst. 1977 #4, pp 6-8
  • Frost Protection the Easy Way. By Frank James. 1976 #4, p 5
  • Fruits the Year Around. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #1, pp 1-4
  • Gleanings: Cold Protection. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #4, pp 22-23
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Growing the Cavendish Banana. By Brian Lievens. 1982 YB, pp 59-62
  • It's the Frost Bugs That Get You (from Science '81). 1982 #4, pp 20-21
  • More Reasons for Befriending the Birds. By Alice A. Estep. 1989 #1, pp 20-21
  • Mulch Destroys Radiant Heat. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #3, p 5
  • Protecting Trees from Cold and Rain. By Peggy Winter. 1979 #3, pp 15-16
  • Rambutan Growing at 29 Degrees Latitude. By Dan Latimer. 1983 #4, p 4
  • Reevaluating Cold Hardiness of Certain Tropical Fruit Trees. By Henry Dawes. 1979 YB, pp 46-49
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45
  • Some Factors Influencing Cold Tolerance in Rare Fruits. By Paul H. Thomson. 1979 YB, pp 34-45
  • To Deal with the Killerfreezing Weather. By Clell E. Bowman. 1975 #4, pp 5-7
  • Visit with Bob and Opal Smith. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #2, pp 19-20
  • Winter Freeze. By Burt Fisch. 1979 YB, pp 28-32

FRUIT DRYING

  • Drying Persimmons for Quality. By R.E. Watts. 1987 J, pp 21-23
  • Jellies, Jams and Dried Fruit. By Wilbur G. Wood. 1973 YB, pp 105-107

FRUIT FACT SHEETS

  • President's Letter. 1989 #4, pp 2-3

FRUIT FLIES

  • December Meeting. By Jim Neitzel. 1984 # 1 pp 25-29
  • Fruit Flies Can Make All California Fruit Rare. 1970 YB, pp 54-56
  • Fruit or Fruit Flies? By Richard E. Watts. 1989 #1, pp 17-19
  • Infestation of Ash White Flies. By Richard S.O. Lee. 1989, #3 pp 22-24
  • Major Fruit Flies of the World. By Dr. Howard V. Weems. 1970 YB, pp 57-63

FRUIT ORGANIZATIONS

  • 7th International Fruit Club Seminar. By David M. Guggenheim. 1989, #4 pp 3-10
  • A Link to Sister Publications. By C.T. Kennedy. 1989 #1, pp 21-22
  • Actinidia Enthusiasts Newsletter (review). By Dianne M. Hand. 1989 J, p 40
  • Bits & Pieces. By Peggy Winter. 1987 #1, pp 25-26
  • Bits & Pieces: Florida Meeting. By Peggy Winter. 1986 #4, pp 27-29
  • Conference West Palm Beach Florida. By Lloyd B. Ryland. 1984 #2, pp 29-30
  • Editor's Mailbag (ECHO, Inc). 1984 #2, pp 2-4
  • Editor's Mailbag. 1980 #3, pp 4-7
  • Exotic Fruit Growers in New South Wales, Australia. By David Wallace. 1984 #2, p 4
  • Fruition Project: Public Plantings. By Clay Olson. 1987 #1, p 8
  • Horticulture: a Facet of Independent Living for the Blind. By Alice A. Estep. 1989, #3 pp 10-11
  • Meeting Florida Fruit Growers. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 18-19
  • Newsletter of the Rare Fruit Council of Australia, Inc.. Reviewed by Ron Kadish. 1989 #1, pp 22-23
  • Report from Brazil. By Rick Parkhurst. 1982 #1, p 14
  • Selected Horticultural Groups. By Kittie R. Rau. 1988 YB, pp 21-22
  • Sister Organizations. 1975 YB, p 9
  • The Rare Fruit Society of Israel. By Ariel Shai. 1987 #4, p 15
  • The Rising Demand for Rare Fruit. By William L. Nelson. 1986 #1, pp 7-8

FRUIT PROCESSING

  • Canned Tropical Fruits. By Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #1, pp 2-3
  • Drought-resistant Fruits and Nuts for the Water-efficient Landscape. By Tom Del Hotal. 1989 J, pp 8-19
  • Educating Our Taste Buds to Accept and Enjoy Exotic Fruit. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #2, pp 6-10
  • Hachiya Persimmons. By Ruth Krasner. 1988 #2, pp 31-32
  • Idea Box: Macadamia Cracker; Fruit Freezing Tips; Garden Hose Post. By John F. Donan. 1984 #4, pp 19-20
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Macadamias in Your Garden. By Lois E. James. 1980 YB, pp 110-115
  • My Favorite Fruit Tree - the Jujube. By Edward T. Hager M.D.. 1989 #2, pp 13-15
  • Ovendried Blueberry "Raisins". By Lloyd Rosenvold. 1983 #3, p 28
  • Solar Oven for Processing Fruits. By Neva Glenn. 1982 #4, p 19
  • The Strawberry Tree and the Madrone. By Melita Israel. 1976 YB, p 88
  • Two Scholars at the CRFG Meeting. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1980 #3 pp 13-14, 21-22

FRUIT REGISTRATION

  • 1971 Fruit Registrations, YB, pp 143-153
  • 1974 Fruit Registrations, YB, pp 311-315
  • 1975 Fruit Registrations, YB, pp 179-185
  • 1976 Fruit Registrations, YB, pp 1-29-134
  • 1979 Fruit Registrations, YB, pp 62-63
  • 1980 Fruit Registrations, YB, pp 1-39-140
  • 1987 Fruit Registrations, J, p 59
  • 1988 Fruit Registrations, J, pp 58-59
  • 1989 Fruit Registrations, J, p 60
  • Registration Procedures, 1989 J, p 59
  • Previous Registrations. 1989 J, inside back cover
  • The Registry of Subtropical Fruit Cultivars. By C.A. Schroeder. 1989 J, pp 55-58

FRUIT SALAD PLANT - Monstera deliciosa

FRUIT SPECIALISTS

  • Fruit Specialists. 1988 YB, p 24
  • Fruit Specialists. By C.T. Kennedy. 1987 YB, p 29
  • Recommended Reading from Fruit Specialists. By Kittie R. Rau. 1988 YB,pp 5-28
  • Something New Under the Sun: Specialists and Interest Groups. By C.T. Kennedy. 1987 #2, pp 30-32

FRUIT STORAGE

  • CRFG'S December Meeting. By Jim Neitzel. 1984 # 1 pp 25-29
  • Kiwifruit: a Cost and Revenue Analysis. By Claude Sweet. 1978 YB, pp 14-56
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • Update from Palm Beach. By Tommy Reese. 1982 #2, pp 19-21

FRUIT TASTING

  • Educating Our Taste Buds to Accept and Enjoy Exotic Fruit. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #2, pp 6-10
  • For Those Impatient New Members. By Roger Meyer. 1988 #4, pp 51-52
  • White Sapote Varieties: Progress Report. By Robert R. Chambers. 1984 YB, pp 56-64

FRUITING

  • Babaco: New Fruit in New Zealand to Reach Commercial Production. By Dick J.W. Endt. 1981 YB, pp 48-52
  • Evolution of Fruiting Plants. By John M. Riley. 1970 YB, pp 1-6
  • Fruit Thinning. By Eph Konigsberg. 1987 YB, pp 24-25
  • Fruiting White Sapotes. 1981 #2, p 5
  • Fruits the Year Around. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #1, pp 1-4
  • Giant Avocado. By Donald W. Mitchell. 1979 #2, pp 15-16
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Kiwifruit: a Cost and Revenue Analysis. By Claude Sweet. 1978 YB, pp 14-56
  • Macadamias in Your Garden. By Lois E. James. 1980 YB, pp 110-115
  • Mangoes in the Arizona Desert. By Alois Falkenstein, M.D.. 1989 #4, pp 12-13
  • More Acerolas Than You Can Eat. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1978 #4, pp 13-15
  • Panama Strawberry Tree Fruiting in Southern California. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #4, p.26
  • Reaping the Benefits of our Cold Wet Winter. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #2, p 24
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45
  • Summer Bearing Avocado Possibilities. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #4, pp 13-14
  • The Japanese Raisin Tree. By John M. Riley. 1981 #4, pp 24-25
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • Two Scholars at the CRFG Meeting. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1980 #3 pp 13-14, 21-22
  • White Sapote Varieties: Progress Report. By Robert R. Chambers. 1984 YB, pp 56-64

FUCHSIA EXCORTICATA
This shrub or small tree from Central South America and New Zealand is a highly versatile and attractive fruiting plant. The fruit is a red, black or purple berry of varying size with several small seeds and can be eaten fresh.

FUCHSIA EXCORTICATA

  • Wild Fruit of New Zealand. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #4, pp 9-10

FUEL

  • Greening of the Future Conclusion. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #4, pp 17-22

FUNGI

  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Mycorrhizae: the Other Half of the Root System. By T.V. St. John. 1985 YB, pp 61-68
  • Note on a Fungus Disease. By Robert R. Chambers. 1989 #4, p 13
  • Rare and Not-so-rare Vegetable and Fruits. By Edward T. Hager, M.D.. 1989 #3, pp 3-5, 6
  • Research Corner. By John Riley. 1983 #3, pp 20-21

FUYU PERSIMMON

  • Ripening the Fuyu Persimmon. By John M. Riley. 1977 #4, p 12

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