Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

Seed Bank

Fruit Specialists (Q & A)

CRFG Member Nurseries and Fruit Sources

Tidbits of Info

 

CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - P

Back to O - Up to Main Index page - Forward to Q


PA-YUEH-CHA See Holboellia

PACHYRIZUS EROSUS See Jicama

PALM FIG See Ficus pseudapalma

PAMA - Garcinia livingstonei

PANAMA

  • CRFG in South America: an Unforgettable Tour. By Robert R. Chambers. 1981 #2, pp 8-12

PANAMA BERRY - Muntingia calabura

PANAPENN See Breadfruit

PANAX GINSENG - Ginseng

PANDANG See Pandanus


PANDANUS ODORATISSIMUS - Breadfruit, Pandang, Screw Pine
A Polynesian and Southeast Asian medium-large tree, with a picturesque silhouette accentuated by prop roots projecting from trunk. Terminal bud is edible. The leaves' tender white base is eaten raw or boiled. Round, cannonball-size fruit resembles a pineapple. The inner fleshy end of each cell, a separate fruit, is sweet and starchy. Seeds at the woody end are edible. Propagated by seed or suckers. See Pandanus
PANDANUS VEITCHII - Striped Screw Pine
A low, spreading tree with a white-margined leaf. Native of the Old World tropics, does well as a potted ornamental. Fruit and nuts are edible. They are used by the natives in the Pacific as an important food tree.

PANDANUS

  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, p 47

PAPAYA

  • "Pickings" From My Garden. By Eunice Messner. 1989 #1, pp 15-16
  • A Journey to Vilcabamba, the Sacred Valley of Ecuador. By Steven Spangler. 1981 #3, pp 14-17
  • Annual Papaya? By Steve Glassman. 1978 YB, pp 72-73
  • Area News. 1984 #3 pp 30-32
  • Babaco - Mountain Papaya a Most Promising Discovery. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 YB, pp 55-56
  • Book Review: 101 Ways to Use Paw Paws. By Annemarie Endt. 1982 #4, p 15
  • Choosing a Variety of Papayas (Carica papaya L.) for Export to Europe. By A. Shai. 1982 YB, pp 63-65
  • Cultivating Rare Fruits in Riverside. By William T. Drysdale. 1976 #2, pp 6-9
  • Did You Know (Papaya). 1989 J, p 33
  • Experiments with Papaya Growing. By Phil Clark. 1983 #4, p 14
  • For the Beginner: Suggestions for New Gardeners. By Phil Clark. 1985 #2, pp 6-9
  • Gleanings: Warm Winter; Need Evaluations. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #4, pp 18-19
  • Growing Papayas in Vista. By Ralph G. Corwin. 1978 #2, pp 1-2
  • Letter to CRFG Members on Papaya Culture. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1978 #2, pp 2-3
  • Mexican Papayas for the Home Garden. By Ralph Corwin. 1979 #3, pp 9-10
  • More on the Papaya. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #2, pp 13-14
  • Notes from Members, Laguna Beach, California. 1977 #2 p 8
  • Oh! Those Green Papayas. By Pat Houghton. 1985 #1, pp 20-21
  • Papaws Grown from Cuttings. By P. Allen. 1986 #3, p 27
  • Papaya and Your Stomach. By Beverly Ferderber. 1981 #3, pp 12-13
  • Papaya. By Brian Lievens. 1979 #2, pp 10-12
  • Papaya. By Floyd L. Cooper. 1970 YB, pp 13-16
  • Papaya, the Melon of Health. By Chester D. French. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1980 #1, p 10
  • Papaya: Why Its Culture Has Languished Here. By E.K. Okamoto. 1970 YB, pp 7-12
  • Practical Tips: Papaya Culture. By Robert F. Allen. 1983 #3, p 14
  • Rare Fruits in Coastal San Diego. By David B. Lloyd. 1975 #3, pp 1-5
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, pp 66-67
  • The Papaya and Its Relatives. By John M. Riley. 1976 YB, pp 112-118
  • The Research Corner: Mountain Papayas; Rooting Hints; Germinating Seed. 1983 #1, p 16
  • Thoughts from Ye Olde Ed. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 #3, pp 5-6
  • Unusual Ideas for Unusual Plants. By Grace Johns. 1971 #1, pp 8-11
  • Visit to a 200 Tree Papaya Grove. By Paul H. Thomson. 1978 #2, p 3
  • Winter in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1976 #2, p 10

PAPPEA CAPENSIS

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

PARADISE NUT - Lecythis zabucajo

PARAGUAY TEA - Ilex paraguariensis


PARKIA BIGLOBOSA - African Locust
A large family of legumes from tropical Africa, having pods containing edible seeds which are roasted. The fleshy substance surrounding the seeds is also edible.

PARMENTIERA ALATA - Mexican calabash


PARMENTIERA EDULIS - Guajilote, Cuachilote
A spiny, medium-sized tree from Guatemala and Mexico, it makes a conversation piece because of its shape and leaves. The fruit, 4 -6" long, 1-2" wide, resembles a cucumber. Edible when yellow. It is cooked or eaten raw but is not of good quality.

PASSIFLORA ANTIOQUIENSIS - Banana Passion Fruit


PASSIFLORA EDULIS - Passion Fruit, Purple Granadilla
Native of Brazil. One of about 350 species of passiflora, many of them with the characteristic flower. The striking flower has given the fruit its name. Found by the colonizing Spanish priests, they were used to explain the crucifixion to their converts. The three styles represented the nails; the stamens, Christ's wounds; the filaments, the crown; and the petals and stamens the Apostles. An extremely vigorous growing vine, furnished with tendrils by which it climbs. Hardy in the southernmost U.S., it should be given a sunny site, sheltered from the cold winds. The fruit is a berry, covered with a hard tough shell. Before ripening, the tough skin is almond-green, when ripe, a dull purple. The flesh is light orange and surrounds many small dark seeds. Propagated by seed or cutting. Hybrids do not come true to seed. See Passiflora
PASSIFLORA EDULIS VAR FLAVICARPA - Yellow Granadilla
A native of Brazil, this vigorous vine has purple flowers and yellow fruits. The three-lobed green leaves are handsome and the fruit tends to be smaller than the purple variety. They are more acid and not as sweet.
PASSIFLORA EDULIS VAR FLAVICARPA X P. EDULIS - Red Granadilla
Possesses the best qualities of both varieties. The fruit has a red shell and excellent flavor. Subject to a freeze. If the roots are protected, they will return with vigor. Propagated by seed, cuttings or air layers.
PASSIFLORA FOETIDA - Love-in-a-mist, Wild Water Lemon
This vigorous delicate vine from Brazil has a tendency to overgrow. Its name derives from the fine net of green enclosing the flowers. It flowers heavily and fruits without hand pollination. The fruits are kumquat sized with a thin, scarlet red shell surrounding a blush-white pulp, mildly sweet, delicately flavored. The leaves have a strong scent when touched. Propagated by seed or cutting.
PASSIFLORA INCARNATA - Maypop
This is the typical vine apricot or northern passion flower. It is native from Virginia southward and westward to Missouri and Texas. It has a tendency to be deciduous, like the love-in-a-mist. The fruit is small, yellow, similar to the yellow granadilla.
PASSIFLORA LAURIFOLIA - Water Lemon, Belle Apple
Widely cultivated in the tropics as an ornamental and for the fruit, it is native from the WestIndies to Eastern Brazil and Peru. The flowers are white with red spots. The fruit is oblong, orange, with a parchment-like shell. The pulp is agreeable and delicate.
PASSIFLORA LIGULARIS - Sweet granadilla
It grows well in the high elevations of Central America. The fruit is sweet, medium large, molded in patterns of orange and yellow. The pulp is sweet and has a distinctive flavor.
PASSIFLORA MALIFORMIS - Sweet Cup, Conch Apple, Sweet Calabash
From the West Indies, this vine bears an excellent fruit but is bothered by cold and nematodes. The dingy yellow-green shell is hard, the yellow pulp tastes like sweet non-acidic grapes. The vine is handsome, having deep red stems and brilliant green leaves.
PASSIFLORA MOLLISSIMA - Curuba, Tacsonia, Banana Passion Fruit, Sweet Calabash
Native to the Andes where it grows wild. Rampant grower suited to colder conditions.
PASSIFLORA PLATYLOBA - Montesa granadilla
It grows well in well lighted conditions but doesn't set fruit readily. The fruit is large and extremely acid. The flower is very beautiful.
PASSIFLORA QUADRANGULARIS - Giant Granadilla
A tropical American vine having large leaves, large pink-purple flowers, and large fruits, it is a favorite in the Caribbean. The fruit is 6-12" long, has three grooves and the thick rind can be eaten as well as the pulp. The melon-like rind is rather tasteless unless it is mixed with the pulp or other fruits for flavoring. The fruit color is greenish yellow. The flavor is an acid sweet. Propagated by seed or cutting.
PASSIFLORA SERRATO - Digitata, Tagua-Tagua
A vine that grows well and does bear with self-pollination. The fruit is about 2" and contains a pulp with a distinct tart, guava-like flavor.
PASSIFLORA VITIFOLIA - Grape-Leaved Passion Fruit
This vine, from Nicaragua, Venezuela and Peru, has three-lobed leaves and a handsome red flower, which makes it easy to identify. The fruit is medium-sized, oblong, yellow, and mildly acid.

PASSIFLORA - Passion Fruit

  • Cultivation of Granadillas in South Africa. By Frans A. Kuhne. 1975 YB, pp 56-70
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Know Your Microclimate. By Mary Frances Stewart. 1972 #1, pp 8-9
  • Notes from Brown Ranch. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #4, p 6
  • Notes on Growing Passiflora in La Mesa. By Joseph C. Smith. 1979 YB, pp 56-58
  • Passionfruit Sugar Cookies. By Christina Jensen. 1983, #1 p 20
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Rare Fruits in Coastal San Diego. By David B. Lloyd. 1975 #3, pp 1-5
  • Recipes: Passionfruit or Granadilla. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 165-178
  • Research Corner Notes. By John Riley. 1984 #2, pp 26-27
  • The Maypop. By David L. Evans. 1989 #1, pp 13-14
  • Tumbo - Avocado Salad. 1981 #1 p 19
  • Wild Fruit of New Zealand. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #4, pp 9-10

PATINOA ALMIRAJO See Barbados Gooseberry

PAW PAW (AUSTRALIA) See Papaya

PAWPAW - Asimina trilobia

  • A Revision of Asimina and Deeringothamus (Annonaceae). By Robert Kral. 1974 YB, pp 91-137
  • A Treatise on the Pawpaw. By James A. Little. 1974 YB, pp 18-29
  • Area News. 1984 #3 p 31
  • Asimina triloba an Unknown American Fruit. By John M. Riley. 1969 #4, pp 2-3
  • Chromosome Numbers in the Annonaceae. By Wray M. Bowden. 1974 YB, pp 73-81
  • Crossing Dwarf Pawpaw with Northern Pawpaw. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #3, p 25
  • Easy Way to Germinate Paw Paw Seeds. By Jau D. Mann. 1978 #4, p 5
  • Farthest North Paw Paw. By Ernestine Lamouraux. 1977 #1, pp 18-20
  • Faultless Paw Paw. By Edward M. Hagy. 1988 #3, p 15
  • From the Editor's Mailbag. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #1, pp 15-16; 1980 #4, pp 4-7
  • Fruits for San Francisco Bay Area. By Martin G. Blinder. 1972 #4, pp 6-7
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Hybrids of the American Papaw. By G.A. Zimmerman. 1974 YB, pp 60-72
  • Info on the Pawpaw. By Rosalie Osbaker. 1980 #1, p 16
  • Paw Paw Fruits Known as Missouri Bananas. By Charley Schaaf. 1988 #3, pp 14-15
  • Paw Paw Index. 1974 YB, pp 202-206
  • Paw Paw: Horticultural Orphan. By Neal Duncan. 1983 #4, p 32
  • Pawpaw. By Jerry A. Payne. 1980 #4, p 5
  • Pawpaw Pointers. By Ralph Kreider. 1989, #3 p 26
  • Pawpaws in Union County, Illinois. By Rudolph E. Leide. 1978 #4, pp 9-10
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Song: The Paw Paw Patch. 1974 YB, p 10
  • The American Papaw and Its' Food Value. By C.F. Langworthy and A.D. Holmes. 1974 YB, pp 39-45
  • The Best Papaws. 1974 YB, pp 46-59
  • The Paw Paw Brought up to Date. By Paul H. Thomson. 1974 YB, pp 138-180
  • The Paw Paw in Illinois. By Robert Kurle. 1974 YB, pp 188-192; 1982 YB, pp 32-35
  • The Paw Paw in Indiana. By Rosa Glaser. 1974 YB, p 196; 1982 YB, p 36
  • The Paw Paw in Kentucky. By Henry Converse, Jr. 1974 YB, pp 197-198; 1982 YB, p 37
  • The Paw Paw in Northern Mississippi. By William S. Robinson. 1974 YB, p 200; 1982 YB, p 42
  • The Paw Paw in Ohio. By Benton R. Duckworth. 1974 YB, pp 193-195; 1982 YB, pp 44-45
  • The Paw Paw in Oklahoma. By Frank A. Johnson. 1974 YB, p 199; 1982 YB, p 46
  • The Paw Paw in Southern Michigan. By Corwin Davis. 1974 YB, pp 181-187; 1982 YB, pp 38-41
  • The Paw Paw in Southern Mississippi. By James J. Anding. 1974 YB, p 201; 1982 YB, p 43
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • The Silva of North America. By Charles Sprague Sargent. 1974 YB, pp 11-17
  • Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of the Southwest: Common Pawpaw. By Robert A. Vines. 1974 YB, pp 89-90
  • Triploid Mutants Among Diploid Seedling Populations of Asimina Triloba. By Wray M. Bowden. 1974 YB, pp 82-88
  • Visit with Corwin Davis. By Richard E. Watts. 1987 #1, pp 19-20
  • Where Are the Best Pawpaws? 1974 YB, pp 30-37

PEACH - Prunus Persica

  • "Pickings" From my Garden. By Eunice Messner.1989 #1, pp 15-16
  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 93
  • Amateur Genetics. By Deane D. Conard. 1974 #4, p 11
  • Bare Root Time Again. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #1, pp 18-21
  • Candianides Peach. By Sal Schettino. 1987 #4, p 31
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Fruits for San Francisco Bay Area. By Martin G. Blinder. 1972 #4, pp 6-7
  • Looking for a Low Chill, Late Peach. By Frank James. 1986 #2, pp 13-14
  • Low Chill Fruits and Subtropicals. By Eunice Messner. 1989 YB, pp 12-16
  • Low Chill Peaches: August Pride; Mid Pride. By Jerry Carne. 1982 #1, p 4
  • Peach Story. By Willie Zoobuck. 1970 #4, pp 2-5
  • Preliminary Apricot and PeachNectarine Comparisons. By David Guggenheim. 1986 #1, pp 22-24
  • Rare Fruits, But Not New. By C.T. Kennedy. 1985 YB, pp 40-51
  • Rating Deciduous Fruits. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1980 #2, pp 11-15
  • Some Interesting New Cultivars. By Jim Neitzel. 1985 #3, p 5

PEACH, DAVID - Prunus dacidiana

PEACH PALM - Bactris gasipaes

PEACH TOMATO - Solanum topiru

PEANUT BUTTER FRUIT - Bunchosia argenta

PEAR - Pyrus communis

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 94
  • Bare Root Time Again. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #1, pp 18-21
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Gleanings: Pears. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #4, pp 18-19
  • Gleanings: Low Chill Pears. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #2, pp 14-15; 1983 #4, pp 26-27
  • Plastics Keep Ripeness Under Wraps. By John Riley. 1987 #4, p 26
  • Rare Fruits. But Not New. By C.T. Kennedy. 1985 YB, pp 40-51
  • Rating Deciduous Fruits. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1980 #2, pp 11-15
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, p 68

PEAR, ASIAN See Asian Pear

PEAR, PRICKLY See Cacti

PEAR, STRAWBERRY - Cereus triangularia

PEAR, WILD HIMALAYAN - Pyrus pashia

PEAR, WILLOW LEAF - Pyrus salicifolia

PECAN - Carya illinoinensis

  • Articles From "Pomona" and the Western Fruit Grower Magazines. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #3, p 19
  • Bare Root Time Again. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #1, pp 18-21
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40

PEDALAI - Artocarpus sericicarpus

PEJIBAYE - Bactris gasipaes

PEPINO

  • News from the Hills. By David Silber. 1988 #4, pp 5-7
  • Notes from a Grower/experimenter. By David Silber. 1987 #3, pp 20-21
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72

PEPPER (Black and White)- Piper nigrum

PEPPER SUBSTITUTE See Xylopia


PERESKIA ACULEATA - Barbados Gooseberry, Lemon Vine
A West Indian cactus shrub with a tendency to vine, it bears spines in pairs or trios. The berry is small, yellow with a juicy, subacid pulp. The flavor is pleasant and is used fresh or preserved. The leaves may be cooked as greens. Propagated by seed or cutting. See Barbados Gooseberry

PERSEA BORBONIA See Bay Trees

PERSEA AMERICANA See Avocado

PERSIAN LIME - Citrus latifolia

PERSIAN MULBERRY - Morus nigra

PERSIMMON (also see Fuyu Persimmon)

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 95
  • A Scientific Experiment. By Pat Weissleader. 1988 #2, pp 8-9
  • CRFG Kitchen: Fuyu Recipes, From Henry Avocado Corp. 1988 #2, pp 28-30
  • CRFG Kitchen: Persimmon Pudding; By Melita Israel. 1988 #3, p 19
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Drying Persimmons for Quality. By R.E. Watts. 1987 J, pp 21-23
  • Fuyu. By John Riley. 1977 #4 p 12
  • Gleanings: Native Persimmons. By Jim Neitzel. 1983 #4, pp 26-27
  • Growing Persimmons. By Pat Houghton. 1989 YB, p 17
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Hachiya Persimmons. By Ruth Krasner. 1988 #2, pp 31-32
  • Lemon-glazed Persimmon Bars. By Evelyn Alberts. 1983 #1, p 20
  • Missouri Persimmons. By Charley Schaaf. 1987 J, p 25
  • Northern California Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: By Gordon Lane. 1987 J, p 29
  • Notes from Northern California Persimmon Assn 1927 Report. 1987 J, pp 43-44
  • Northern Calif. Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: Rootstocks for Persimmons. By Eugene Fowler. 1987 J, pp 39-40
  • Northern Calif. Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: the Kaki or Oriental Persimmon. By I. J. Condit. 1987 J, pp 29-38
  • Northern Calif. Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: Uses of Persimmon Tree (Recipes). 1987 J, pp 41-43
  • Northern Calif. Persimmon Assn 1927 Report: Persimmon Wood. 1987 J, pp 40-41
  • Nostalgic Memories of North China Fruits. By Albert Fei. 1971 #1, pp 5-7
  • Oriental Persimmons in Florida. By Harold N. Acrivos. 1987 J, pp 23-24
  • Persimmon Ebenaceae. 1987 J, p 20
  • Persimmon is a Specialty Crop with Growing Demand. By Claude Sweet. 1987 J, pp 26-28
  • Persimmons: Now That We Have Them, What Do We Do With Them? By Irving Bernsen. 1988 #2, pp 4-7
  • Problems with Varietal Names. By Robert R. Chambers. 1986 #4, p 23
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Removing Astringency from Persimmons. By Claude Sweet. 1980 #2, pp 12-13
  • Some Notes on Nonastringent Persimmon Cultivars. By C.A. Schroeder. 1987 J, pp 1-5
  • Texas Persimmon. By John M. Riley. 1976 YB, pp 82-83
  • The Pleasures of Growing a Fuyu Persimmon Tree. By Caroline Hoover. 1987 J, pp 6-7
  • The Potential of Isozymes for Persimmon cv Identification. By N.C. Ellstrand and J.M. Lee. 1987 3, pp 10-11
  • Things to Do With the Fuyu Persimmon. By John M. Riley. 1974 YB, pp 296-301

PERSONS OF NOTE

  • A Mercadante Tribute. By Gray Martin. 1987 #4, p 7
  • CRFG Loses a Friend. By Pat Sawyer. 1988 #3, p 29
  • John Riley: a CRFG Member Worth Knowing. By Florence Strange 1987 #4, p 10
  • Visit with Corwin Davis. By Richard E. Watts. 1987 #1, pp 19-20

PERU

  • CRFG in South America: an Unforgettable Tour. By Robert R. Chambers. 1981 #2, pp 8-12

PEST CONTROL

  • Abstract: 20th Anniversary Meeting: Beneficial Insects. By Monte Carpenter. 1988 #4, pp 28-29
  • Ale Kills Snails. By Jim Pederson. 1981 #4, p 5
  • Apple Tree Borer. By Viola Schneider. 1989 #3 p 32
  • Asparagus or Marigolds Rid Figs and Papayas of Nematode Problems. By John N. Wilkes. 1981 #1, p 5
  • Babaco: New Fruit in New Zealand to Reach Commercial Production. By Dick J.W. Endt. 1981 YB, pp 48-52
  • Baby Powder to Avoid Damage to Plants by Rabbits. By Mary F. Stewart. 1973 #3, p 9
  • Birds and Fruit. By Louis Schlom. 1972 #1, p 7
  • Birds: Natural Pest Control. By Alice E. Estep. 1987 J, pp 53-57
  • Cultural Nuggets for Would-be Apple Growers. Talk by J. Rider. Reported by Melita Israel. 1989 #2, pp 16-19
  • Do You Know What a Flathead Borer Is? By Charles E. Estep, Sr. 1987 #1, pp 21-24
  • Furred and Feathered Garden Pests. By Gail Culver. 1987 YB, pp 23-24
  • Gleanings: Gophers; Soap for Insects. By Jim Neitzel. 1984 #2, pp 15-17
  • Graft Sealer; Egg Shells for Snails. By Philip Cohen. 1982 #2, pp 4-5
  • Greening of the Future. Part II. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #3, pp 15-16
  • Ground Squirrels a Persistent Pest. 1986 #2, pp 25-26
  • Hanging by a Silken Thread. By Charles E. Estep, Sr. 1989 #3, p 21
  • Idea Box: Bait Box. 1986 #4, p 25
  • Idea Box: Varmint Control. By John F. Donan. 1985 #1, pp 13-14
  • Insect Control. By William L. Nelson. 1987 YB, p 22
  • Marigolds Prevent Nematodes. 1970 #1, p 2
  • New Method for Insect Control "Polytrap". By Renan Prevost. 1972 #4, pp 4-5
  • "Pickings" From My Garden. By Eunice Messner. 1989 #1, pp 15-16
  • Pocket Gopher Problems and How to Deal with Them. By Robert Acker. 1986 #1, pp 33-34
  • Research Corner. By John Riley. 1983 #3, pp 20-21; 1984 #3, p 23
  • Some Practical Hints for the Backyard Gardener. By Anna Tamuzs. 1979 #3, p 12
  • Subtropical Fruits and Nuts of Spain, Kenya and South Africa. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 #1, pp 6-13
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • Unusual Ideas for Unusual Plants. By Grace Johns. 1971 #1, pp 8-11
  • Useful Insects. By Charles E. White. 1984 #4, p 17

PESTS

  • All About Bananas. By William F. Whitman. 1983 YB, p 81
  • Calendar of a Shothole Borer. By Charles E. Estep, Sr. 1989 #4, pp 21-22
  • Further Report on Establishing a Mango Grove. By Jerry H. Staedeli. 1977 YB, pp 32-34
  • Giant African Snail Achatina Fulica in Florida. By H.A. Denmark and C. Poucher. 1971 YB, pp 120-125
  • Horsecapades (Horses). By Clell E. Bowman. 1977 #4, pp 10-11
  • Host Plants for Diseases. 1989 YB, p 40
  • Jojoba Horticulture. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 YB, pp 98-162
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • More Reasons for Befriending the Birds. By Alice A. Estep. 1989 #1, pp 20-21
  • Nematodes in the Garden. 1971 YB, pp 126-131
  • Nutrition and Pests. By Harry Foehner. 1975 #4, p 12
  • Papaya. By Brian Lievens. 1979 #2, pp 10-12
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Symbiosis and Elaeagnus. By William T. Drysdale. 1976 #3, pp 8-9
  • The Biggest Meeting So Far. 1983 #1, p 9
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29
  • The European Earwig. By Martha Van Ness. 1972 YB, pp 1-09-111
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • The Rose Apple. By Burton E. Fisch. 1976 YB, p 106
  • The Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 268-290
  • Varmints, Critters and Beasties of the Night. By William T. Drysdale. 1973 #3, p 12
  • What's Going Wrong? or How to Diagnose Some Kiwi Problems. By Roger Meyer. 1989 J, pp 34-36

PHALSA CHERRY - Grewia tenax

PHILIPPINE FIG See Ficus pseudapalma

PHILIPPINE PALM See Ficus pseudapalma

PHILIPPINE TEA - Ehretia microphylla

PHILIPPINES

  • Amaiit: Flacourtia rukam. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 37
  • Bago: Gnetum Gnemon; Gnetaceae. By Roberto E. Coronel. 1983 #3, p 26
  • Bignai: Antidesma bunius. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 37
  • Book Review: Our Philippine Fruit and Their Preparation. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 12
  • Book Review: Promising Fruits of the Philippines. By R.E.Coronel. Reviewed by Brian Lievens. 1984 #3, pp 21-22
  • Calamunggay: Moringa pterygosperma. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 38
  • Camito: Chrysophyllum cainito. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 37-38
  • Canarium ovatum. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 43
  • Daylap: Citrus aurantifolia. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 38-39
  • Duhat: Eugenia jambolana. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 39
  • Durian: Durio zibethinus. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 39-40
  • Folk Medicine in Southeast Asia. By Lucy P. Hall. 1982 #4, pp 29-30
  • Galumpi: Clausena lansium. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 40
  • Kalamansi: Citrus mitus. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 40
  • Kamatsele: Pithecellobium dulce. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 40-41
  • Katmon: Dillenia philippinensis. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 41
  • Lipote: Syzygium curranii Igot. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 41
  • Makopa: Syzygium malaccense. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 41-42
  • Marang: Artocarpus odoratissimus. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 42
  • More Remembered Trees of the Philippines: By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 37-44
  • Nipa: Nypa fruticans. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 42-43
  • Proposal for Standardizing Names of Fruits in the Philippines. By Roberto E. Coronel. 1982 YB, pp 76-79
  • Ratiles: Muntingia calabura. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 43-44
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, pp 52-69
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1978 YB, pp 5-13
  • Rimas: Artocarpus communis. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 44
  • Sapote negro: Diospyros digyna. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 44
  • Southeast Asia. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #2, pp 21-22
  • Suha: Citrus grandis. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, pp 44-45
  • Susung calaboa: Lingaro. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 45
  • Talisai: Terminalia catappa. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 45

PHOENIX CANARIENSIS - Canary Island Date


PHOENIX DACTYLIFERA - Date, Date Palm
Monoecious. This tall evergreen, unbranched palm from the Middle East can grow to 100'. It grows well in the Imperial Valley of Southern California. The trunk is covered with fibers, is surrounded from the ground upward with the base of earlier formed leaves. The end of the leaf fronds are needle sharp. The fruit is a drupe with one seed. When ripe, the fruit is a dull yellow and the flesh is soft and buttery. When dried, the skins of the fruit darken. Propagated by seed, but generally by suckers taken from the base of the plant. See Date

PHOENIX SPECIES See Date

PHOENIX RECLINATA - Senegal date

PHOENIX RUPICOLA - East Indian Wine Palm

PHOENIX SYLVESTRIS - India date

PHOENIX ZEYLANICA - Ceylon date


PHYLLANTHUS ACIDUS - Otaheite Gooseberry, Grosella, Cheremai
Dioecious. A native of Madagascar and India; the manner of fruiting is remarkable. The fruit hang in clusters, along the limbs, branches and trunk. It sometimes produces two crops a year. The fruit is waxy and light yellow, fleshy and ribbed, turban-like. The flavor is tart and like that of a gooseberry. It is best cooked with sugar and served as a compote or a pie filling. In India, it is used in pickles and preserves. Propagated by seed, cutting and air layer.
PHYLLANTHUS EMBLICA - Emblic, Myrobalan
Dioecious. A large tree from tropical Asia, it is a handsome landscape plant having tiny yellow flowers which develop into small green to yellow, sour fruit, which is high in vitamin C. They are usually made into preserves and, in India, the bark and leaves are used in tanning. Propagated by seed or budding.

PHYSALIS IXOCARPA - Tomatillo, Husk Tomato

PHYSALIS LOBATA - Purple ground cherry

PHYSALIS PERUVIANA See Cape Gooseberry

PICKLE FRUIT - Averrhoa bilimbi

PIGEON PEA - Cajanus cajan

PIGNUT - Carya cordiformis

PILI NUT

  • Canarium Ovatum. By John McIntyre, Jr. 1977 YB, p 43

PIMENTA DIOICA - Allspice Tree
A medium-size tree of tropical America, it has large oblong leaves with prominent veins underneath and a clove-like odor when crushed. The flowers are small and white; the fruit is about ¼" across, dark brown when ripe. Propagated by seed. See Allspice

PIMENTA RACEMOSA - Bay Rum tree

PIN CUSHION FRUIT - Nauclea latifolios

PINDO PALM - Butia capitata

PINE NUT: PINUS PINEA See Pinus

PINEAPPLE GUAVA See Feijoa

PINEAPPLE

  • Down Under. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 22-31
  • Editor's Mailbag. 1980 #2, pp 4-6
  • How to Grow a Pineapple Plant. By MaryLouise Gurley. 1979 #3, pp 17-18
  • Rare Fruits in Coastal San Diego. By David B. Lloyd. 1975 #3, pp 1-5
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, p 67
  • Starting Your Own Pineapples. By CRFG Staff. 1985 #4, pp 30-31

PINGUIN - Bromelia pinguin

PINK BANANA - Musa velutina

PINUS PINEA - Pine nut. see Pinus

PINUS

  • A Tree of Many Uses. By Louis Trap. 1988 #1, pp 17-18
  • Notes from Members, Fullerton, California. 1977 #2, p 9
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

PIPER METHYSTICUM - Kava, Kava-Kava
Dioecious. This shrub, growing from a stout rhizome with large leaves 10" long and 8" wide, is a native of the Pacific Islands where an intoxicating drink is made from the roots of the plant. The leaves have a licorice flavor. Propagated by runners on the roots.

PIPER NIGRUM - Black/white pepper

PISTACHIO

  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • News from the Hills. By David Silber. 1988 #4, pp 5-7
  • Pistachio Climate Table. By Ron Kadish. 1982 #4, p 3
  • Pistachio Update. By Ron Kadish. 1982 #3, pp 5-7
  • What about Pistachios? By Paul Thomson. 1979 #4, p 9

PISTACIA VERA See Pistachio

PITANGA See Surinam Cherry

PITAYA

  • Jellies, Jams and Dried Fruit. By Wilbur G. Wood. 1973 YB, pp 105-107

PITHECELLOBIUM DULCE - Manila Tamarind
A very spiny tropical tree, native to Mexico and Central America that is used as an ornamental, shade tree or hedge. Fruit is a long, red, spiraling pod with sweet, white, spongy pulp containing flat, black seeds. The whole pod is eaten boiled. Pulp is used raw or in drinks. Wood is used for lumber and bark produces a dye, adhesive gum and tannin. Propagated by seed, cuttings and air-layer. See Manila Tamarind

PITOMBA

  • Eugenia luschnathiana. By Alan Bredeson. 1980 #4, pp 26-29

PLANT CONTAINERS

  • Pruning Planter Box. By Robert Calvert. 1987 #1, pp 14-18
  • Using Tires in the Garden. By Louis Lopyan. 1984 #4, pp 2-3

PLANT GENETICS

  • Amateur Genetics. By Deane D. Conard. 1974 #4, p 11
  • Cherimoya Cultivar Identification. By N.C. Ellstrand, J.M. Lee and M.L. Arpaia. 1989, #3 pp 8-9
  • CRFG Visits a Tissue Culture Laboratory. By David Kier. 1986 #3, p 19
  • Evolution of Fruiting Plants. By John M. Riley. 1970 YB, pp 1-6
  • Hybrids of the American Pawpaw. By G.A. Zimmerman. 1974 YB, pp 60-72
  • I Wonder Where the Water Went? By Pat Sawyer. 1989 YB, pp 8-11
  • Isozymes/Cherimoya Cultivar Identification: Progress Report. By Norman C. Ellstrand and Janet M. Lee. 1984 #3, pp 8-9
  • Need to Develop Seedling Strains in Fruit Trees. By Douglas M. Hinds. 1973 YB, pp 91-100
  • Stone Fruit and Grape Production. By David W. Ramming. 1978 YB, pp 74-77

PLANT IMPORTATION

  • Fruit or Fruit Flies? By Richard E. Watts. 1989 #1, pp 17-19
  • Plant Introduction. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #3, pp 9-14
  • President's Letter. 1989 #2, p 2
  • United States Plant Introduction Station. 1971 YB, pp 135-140

PLANT PATENTS

  • Plant Patents. By John C. Oberlin. 1977 YB, pp 9-11

PLANT PROTECTION

  • Are Light Freezes That Important? By William F. Whitman. 1985 #3, p 15
  • Macadamias in Your Garden. By Lois E. James. 1980 YB, pp 110-115
  • On Snail Control. By T.W. Fisher. 1981 #2, p 17
  • Protecting Young Plants. By John F. Donan. 1985 #2, p 21

PLANT REGISTRATION

  • CRFG Census. By Richard D. Tkachuck. 1985 #3, pp 17-18; 1985 #4, pp 17-18
  • Fruit Registration. 1970 YB, pp 73-77; 1986 YB, pp 59-60
  • Information for Plant Registration. 1989 J, p 58
  • Registration of Varieties. By Paul H. Thomson. 1969 #3, pp 3-4

PLANT SALES

  • 7th International Fruit Seminar (Florida). By David M. Guggenheim. 1989, #4 pp 3-10
  • Expanding Our Available Stock. By Burt Fisch. 1979 #4, p 7
  • Rare Fruit Stock Sales Give Multiple Benefits. By Dan Richardson. 1978 YB, pp 3-4
  • Winter Tour and Plant Sale. By John McIntyre Jr. 1980 #1, pp 5-7

PLANT SIZE

  • A Challenge to CRFG. By Claude Sweet. 1979 #4, pp 4-6
  • Gibberellic Acid and the Mangosteen. By Alois Falkenstein, M.D. 1989, #3 p 7
  • Need for More and Bigger Plants. By Claude Sweet. 1979 #3, pp 13-14

PLANT SUPPORTS

  • Housebreaking and Training Your Grapevine. By C.T. Kennedy. 1986 YB, pp 28-32
  • Questions and Answers. 1985 #3, pp 19-20
  • Training and Pruning the Kiwi. By S. Wilson. 1986 #2, pp 7-9
  • Three Ideas for Garden Supports. By John F. Donan. 1986 #1, pp 19-20

PLANTAINS

  • Bananas. By Brian Lievens. 1988 J, pp 9-13

PLANTER MIX

  • Container Culture. By William L. Nelson. 1982 YB, pp 47-49
  • Containerized Layering of Malus Rootstocks. By Richard H. Munson. 1982 YB, pp 50-54
  • Something for the Pot. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1973 #2, pp 11-12
  • Starting the New Tree. By Walter Jerris. 1985 #3, pp 6-7

PLANTING, DENSITY

  • Gleanings: High Density Planting. By Jim Neitzel. 1983, #2 pp 30-31

PLATONIA INSIGNIS - Bacuri
A native of Brazil, it bears yellow, orange-sized fruit with seeds that taste like almonds and white pulp that is slightly acid but pleasant. The tree is very tender but can be grown with protection from the cold.
PLEIOGYNIUM TIMORIENSE - Burdekin Plum
This medium-sized, deciduous tree from Australia produces its flowers in the leaf axils on panicles. The purple, plum sized fruit has thin subacid pulp and a number of seeds and is used in jelly. Propagated by seed.

PLUM

  • "Pickings" From My Garden. By Eunice Messner. 1989 #1, pp 15-16
  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, pp 93-94
  • Bare Root Time Again. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #1, pp 18-21
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Gleanings: Plum. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #4, pp 18-19; 1982 #1, pp 22-24; 1985 #3, pp 24-25
  • Landscaping with Rare Fruits. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #2, pp 1-4
  • Rare Fruits, But Not New. By C.T. Kennedy. 1985 YB, pp 40-51
  • Rating Deciduous Fruits. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1980 #2, pp 11-15
  • The Elsie Plum. By Robert Graham. 1978 #4, p 10
  • The Sugar Prune. By William T. Drysdale. 1976 #4, p 5

PLUMCOT

  • Rare Fruits, But Not New. By C.T. Kennedy. 1985 YB, pp 40-51

POHA BERRY See Cape Gooseberry


POLLIA SORZOGONENSIS - Pollia
This Asia creeper, often used as an ornamental, has leaves that have light and dark green stripes. The fruit is edible. Propagated by seed or cutting.

POLLINATION

  • An Alternative Method for Cherimoya Flower Pollination. By Bob Holzinger. 1987 #3, p 9
  • Avocado Pollination in the San Fernando Valley, etc. By Phillip Frankel. 1970 #4, p 6
  • Cherimoya Riddle. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 8-12
  • Evolution of Fruiting Plants. By John M. Riley. 1970 YB, pp 1-6
  • Gathering Pollen for Cherimoya Pollination. By Phil Clark. 1986 #2, pp 3-4
  • Hybrids of the American Pawpaw. By G.A. Zimmerman. 1974 YB, pp 60-72
  • Jojoba Horticulture. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 YB, pp 98-162
  • Pineapple Guava. By Paul H. Thomson. 1984 YB, pp 28-31
  • Pollinating Cherimoya. By Joseph Marconi. 1988 #4, p 56
  • Pollination Techniques and Gibberellin Treatments for Cherimoya Fruit Set. By Wade Cornell. 1981 YB, pp 69-74
  • Pruning and Pollinating the Cherimoya (Annona cherimola). By Orton H. Englehart. 1974 YB, pp 215-220
  • Some Experiments on Cherimoya Pollination. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1983 YB, pp 30-36
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • The Paw Paw in Illinois. By Robert Kurle. 1982 YB, pp 32-35
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • Using Hormone Sprays to Pollinate Cherimoya. By Amos Blumenfeld. 1980 #2, p 4
  • White Sapote Varieties: Progress Report. By Robert R. Chambers. 1984 YB, pp 56-64

POMEGRANATE

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 95
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Further Thoughts on Adjusting to Our Drier Climate. By E. Hager, R. Watts and A. Ramirez. 1989 #4, pp 14-21
  • Growing Rare Fruit in No. California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Pomegranates, More Wonderful Than Wonderful, But What to Call Them? By Florence Strange. 1988 #1, pp 3-4
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr. 1976 YB, p 61

POMETIA PINNATA - Fijian Longan
This native of tropical Asia is a large evergreen tree grown in the warmer areas because it is cold tender. The tiny green flowers, in long panicles, develop into small round, brownish, leathery skinned fruit with a subacid flesh surrounding a seed. The seeds are edible when roasted. Propagated by seed and air layer.

POMERAC See Malay Apple

POMME CYTHERE See Ambarella

POMME ROSE See Rose Apple

PONCIRUS TRIFOLIATA - Trifoliate orange

POND APPLE

  • Chromosome Numbers in the Annonaceae. By Wray M. Bowden. 1974 YB, pp 73-81

POSSUM APPLE See American persimmon

POTATO TREE - Solanum macranthum


POUROUMA CECROPIFOLIA - Amazon Tree-Grape
A slow-growing, small tree from the Amazon Basin. Easily damaged by temperatures below 40°F. It bears a round, red berry in large bunches that has sweet pulp and one seed. Propagated by seed.
POUTERIA CAIMITO - Abiu, Caimo
A native of South America sometimes confused with the star apple, Chrysophyllum caimito. One of the best fruits of the Sapotaceae family, resembling canistel in habit, growth and foliage. Fruit is almost round with a thick, light-yellow skin and tough, white, translucent flesh. Until fully ripe, it contains a latex which sticks to the lips. Propagated by grafting or seed, though seedlings are variable.
POUTERIA CAMPECHIANA - Canistel, Eggfruit, Lucuma, Nervosa, Yiessas
This small-to-medium evergreen tree from Central and Northern South America makes a good landscape tree but it cannot stand frost. The fruit is variable in size and shape, with a thin yellow to orange skin covering a dry to moist pulp,sweet, musky, rich and generally either loved or despised. Eaten fresh or cooked in place of yam, it is picked when mature and allowed to set until soft and ripe. Propagated by seed or grafting. See Canistel
POUTERIA HYPOGLAUCA
This small evergreen tree from Mexico can be used as an ornamental landscape plant. The fruit has a hard shell or thick skin, white, granular flesh that is pleasant and one large seed. Propagated by seed or air layer.
POUTERIA OBOVATA - Lucma, Lucmo
This medium evergreen tree from South America is more cold tolerant than the canistel. The fruit is ornate with sweet yellow pulp that contains 1-5 large seeds. Propagated by seed and grafting.
POUTERIA SAPOTA - Mamey Sapote, Mamey Colorado
A large-leaved, spreading, large tree from Central America, it is considered by Cubans to produce the best fruit in the world. This egg-shaped fruit is 3-6" long (some varieties are larger) with a brown, scruffy surface. A woody cover encloses the pulp and one large seed. The flesh is fine and reddish, sweet in some varieties and insipid in others. The fruit is picked when the layer under the skin is brown (not green), but the fruit is still hard. It is used fresh, in milk shakes and ice cream. Cold tender when young, it attains more hardiness as it ages. See Mamey Sapote
POUTERIA VIRIDI - Green Sapote
This relative of the Mamey Sapote has smaller, darker green leaves. The small, green fruit, turning to golden when ripe, is superior in flavor to the Mamey Sapote but the tree is difficult to grow. See Green Sapote

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

  • 1979 Claude Sweet. 1979 #1, pp 6-8; #2, pp 2-4; #3, pp 4-5; #4, pp 4-6
  • 1980 Claude Sweet, Looking Forward to the 1980's, 1980 #1 pp 3-4; #2 pp 7-8;
  • 1980 Cal Bream. 1980 #3, p 7; #4 pp 8-9
  • 1981 Cal Bream. 1981 #1 pp 8-9; #2 pp 6-7; #3 p 7; #4 p 7
  • 1982 Pat Sawyer. 1982 #1, p 8; #2, p 8; #3, p 5; #4, pp 8-9
  • 1983 Pat Sawyer. 1983 #1, pp 5-6; #2, pp 6-7; #3, pp 3-4; #4, pp 7-8
  • 1984 Pat Sawyer. 1984 #1, pp 6-7; #2, p 5; #3, p 7; #4, p 10
  • 1985 G.F. Emerich. 1985 #1, pp 27-28; #2, p 5; #3, p 4; #4, p 4
  • 1986 G.F. Emerich. 1986 #1, p 4; #2, p 5; #3, p 5; #4, p 2
  • 1987 G.A. Frickmann. 1987 #1, p 4; #2, p 2; #3, p 2; #4, p 2; YB, pp 46-47; Notes from President's Diary. 1987 YB, pp 46-47
  • 1988 G.A. Frickmann. 1988 #1, p 2; #2, p 2; #3, p 2; #4, p 2
  • 1988: the President's View of the Future. G.A. Frickmann. 1988 YB, pp 42-44
  • 1989 G.A. Frickmann. 1989 #1, pp 2-4; #2, p 2; #3, pp 2-3; #4, pp 2-3
  • 1989: the Year of Changes, G.A. Frickmann. 1989 YB, pp 42-43

PRODUCE VENDORS

  • Free Farmer-to-Consumer Directories. By Gary Martin. 1982 #1, p 18
  • Potential Outlets for Subtropical or Unusual Fruits. 1986 #1, p 11

PROPAGATION

  • Annual Papaya? By Steve Glassman. 1978 YB, pp 72-73
  • Babaco Ecuadorian Fruit with Commercial Potential. By Joy C. Hofmann. 1981 YB, pp 53-54
  • Baby Nipples on Scions. By BoyceBarnes. 1984 #1, p 4
  • Bananas in Your Backyard. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #4, p 25
  • Better Roots Through Chemistry. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1973 YB, pp 2-5
  • Bignay: Antidesma Bunius, Euphorbiaceae. By Roberto E. Coronel. 1982 #1, pp 20-21
  • Bill Nelson's Pine Patch. By Peggy Winter. 1981 #1, p 6
  • Book Review: Plant Propagation. Reviewed by Carol Frye Graham. 1982 #1, p 25
  • Book Review: Native Plant Propagation. 1988 #3, p 28
  • Book Review: Plant Propagation, Principles and Practices 3rd Ed. Reviewed by Warren J. Amstutz. 1975 #4, p 8
  • Book Review: After Dinner Gardening Book Reviewed by John McIntyre Jr. 1976 #1, p 7
  • Book Review: The Propagation of Tropical Fruit Trees. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 13
  • Building a Mist Propagating Frame. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1975 YB, pp 74-89
  • Constructing an Inexpensive Mist Switch. By Bill Lindsay. 1989 #1, pp 24-25
  • Cultivation of Granadillas in South Africa. By Frans A. Kuhne. 1975 YB, pp 56-70
  • Easy Way to Germinate Paw Paw Seeds. By Jay D. Mann. 1978 #4, p 5
  • Experiments, Successes and Failures. By John M. Riley. 1981 #4, p 11
  • Further Report on Establishing a Mango Grove. By Jerry H. Staedeli. 1977 YB, pp 32-34
  • Getting Over the Rough Spots of Mango Propagation. By T. T. Reese. 1988 #3, pp 7-8
  • Getting Raisin Trees to Sprout. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #4, p 14
  • Gleanings: Dormancy; Citrus; Grape; Plum. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #1, pp 22-24
  • Gleanings: Propagation Notes. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 24-25
  • Growing Fruits From Seeds. By Rosalie Osbaker. 1977 #4, pp 2-4
  • Growing Rare Fruit from Seed. By John M. Riley. 1970 #3, pp 1-3; 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • How I Grow Seedlings. By Anna Tamuzs. 1979 #2, pp 5-6
  • How to Grow a Pineapple Plant. By MaryLouise Gurley. 1979 #3, pp 17-18
  • Growing in Containers; Germinating Seeds. By John F. Donan. 1985 #2, pp 20-21
  • Inverse Squares and Other Things. By Richard D. Tkachuck. 1986 #4, pp 18-19
  • Jojoba Horticulture. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 YB, pp 98-162
  • Letter to CRFG Members on Papaya Culture. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1978 #2, pp 2-3
  • Low Cost Mist Bed Control System. By Bob Smith. 1984 #1, pp 10-11
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Method of Propagation. By Claude Sweet. 1988 YB, pp 32-33
  • Mexican Papayas for the Home Garden. By Ralph Corwin. 1979 #3, pp 9-10
  • Miracle of Plant Propagation. By Phil Clark. 1982 #3, pp 1-4, 29
  • Monstera Deliciosa. By Muriel Fisch. 1976 YB, p 89
  • My Favorite Fruit Tree - the Jujube. By Edward T. Hager M.D. 1989 #2, pp 13-15
  • Need to Develop Seedling Strains in Fruit Trees. By Douglas M. Hinds. 1973 YB, pp 91-100
  • Papaws Grown From Cuttings. By P. Allen. 1986 #3, p 27
  • Papaya. By Brian Lievens. 1979 #2, pp 10-12
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Pineapple Guava. By Paul H. Thomson. 1984 YB, pp 28-31
  • Preliminary Jojoba Report. By Betty Bretz. 1978 #4, pp 11-13
  • Preliminary Observations on Growing Mangoes. By Pat C. Pendse. 1975 #2, pp 2-5
  • Producing Plants for CRFG. By Tito Steere. 1982 #2, p 26
  • Report on Casimiroa Edulis, the White Sapote. By Robert R. Chambers. 1977 YB, pp 18-19
  • Research Corner. By John Riley. 1983 #3, pp 20-21
  • Rootstock Propagation: Your Choice. By Charles E. Estep, Sr. 1987 #2, pp 11-15
  • Save the Whale ... And Jojoba Too! By John M. Riley. 1980 #2, p 10
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72
  • Some Practical Hints for the Backyard Gardener. By Anna Tamuzs. 1979 #3, pp 12-13
  • Some Seed Sowing Suggestions. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1974 YB, pp 251-267
  • Start Your Own Figs: A Good Propagation Experience for the Beginner. By George F. Emerich. 1986 #1,pp 16-17
  • Tamarind (Tamarindus indica). By Brian Lievens. 1979 #3, pp 11-12
  • The Carissa in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 YB, p 76
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, p 16
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • The Maypop. By David L. Evans. 1989 #1, pp 13-14
  • The Medlar. By George Polkowski. 1976 YB, p 120
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • The Rising Demand for Rare Fruit. By William L. Nelson. 1986 #1, pp 7-8
  • The Rose Apple. By Burton E. Fisch. 1976 YB, p 106
  • The Russet Cherimoya of Guatemala. Talk by K. Maxwell. Reported by Melita Israel. 1989, #3 pp 24-25
  • The Strawberry Tree and the Madrone. By Melita Israel. 1976 YB, p 86
  • The Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 268-290
  • Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of the Southwest: Common Pawpaw. By Robert A. Vines. 1974 YB, pp 89-90
  • Trials/Tribulations and Success: Growing Kiwi at Mar Vista. By Horace Whittaker. 1983 #3, pp 7-10

PRUNING

  • A Novel Shape for a Fig. By Peggy Winter. 1982 #1, p 11
  • Babaco: New Fruit in New Zealand to Reach Commercial Production. By Dick J.W. Endt. 1981 YB, pp 48-52
  • Books and Articles Useful for Pruning and Other Cultural Practices. By Muriel Fisch. 1981 YB, pp 66-68
  • Capulin Cherry Pruning Experiment. By Wade Hampton Cornell. 1981 #3, p 9
  • Cherimoya Riddle. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 8-12
  • Fruit Experiments in Upland, California. By Pat Weissleader. 1984 #4, pp 21-23
  • Growing Tea. By Peggy Winter. 1979 #4, pp 8-9
  • Introducing the Actinidia. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1989 J, pp 20-21
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Pruning and Pollinating the Cherimoya (Annona cherimola). By Orton H. Englehart. 1974 YB, pp 215-220
  • Pruning. By Muriel Fisch. 1981 YB, pp 57-65
  • Pruning Planter Box. By Robert Calvert. 1987 #1, pp 14-18
  • Pruning the Kiwifruit Vine. By Claude Sweet. 1981 #4, pp 8-10
  • Questions and Answers. By Richard D. Tkachuck 1985 #2, pp 10-11
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • The Tree Tomato. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1974 YB, pp 268-290

PRUNUS AVIUM - Sweet Cherry

PRUNUS ARMENIACA See Apricot

PRUNUS BESSEYI See Sand Cherry

PRUNUS CAROLINIANUS See Wild Orange

PRUNUS DEPRESSA See Sand Cherry

PRUNUS DOMESTICA See Plum

PRUNUS DULCIS / AMYGDALINUS See Almond

PRUNUS HYBRID - Plumcot

PRUNUS LYONII See Catalina Cherry

PRUNUS MARITIMA See Beach Plum

PRUNUS PERSICA VAR NUCIPERSICA See Nectarine

PRUNUS PERSICA See Peach

PRUNUS PUMILA See Sand Cherry


PRUNUS SALICIFOLIA - Capulin, Capulin Tropical Cherry
This small subtropical tree from South and Central America is a wild cherry of the tropics. The flowers are white and fruit is maroon-purple covering a pale-green, juicy flesh. It is eaten fresh or in preserves. Propagated by seed or grafting. See Capulin

PRUNUS SUBCORDATA See Sierra Plum

PRUNUS TOMENTOSA See Nanking Cherry

PRUNUS VIRGINIANA See Choke Cherry


PSEUDANAMOMIS UMBELLULIFERA
A medium-size, ornamental evergreen shrub from Venezuela. Small, yellow fruit with juicy, sweet pulp surrounding a seed. It grows well in beach sand. Propagated by seed.

PSIDIUM ARACA (P. guineense) - Araca, Castilian guava

PSIDIUM CATTLEIANUM - Cattley Guava, Red Strawberry Guava

PSIDIUM CATTLEIANUM VAR LUCIDIUM - Giant Yellow guava


PSIDIUM FRIEDRICHSTHALIANUM -Cas, Costa Rica guava
This moderate-growing, small tree from Central America grows well in protected areas but doesn't bear well. It bears large, white fragrant flowers and large round or oval, green-to-yellow fruit with a number of seeds and white, slightly acid but tasty flesh. It is eaten fresh, in ades or jellies. Propagated by seed or air layer.
PSIDIUM GUAJAVA - Apple guava, yellow guava
There are many named varieties of this small-to-medium evergreen tree, native to the area from Mexico to northern South America. It is characterized by a slender trunk with peeling bark and raised veins on the upper part of the leaves and a fine down on the bottom. The fruit varies from round to oval to pear-shaped; with yellow-to-red skin, surrounding white, pink or red flesh that also varies from soft to firm and contains a number of hard seeds in the center. The fruit has an aroma that some people like or dislike. It can be eaten fresh, made into jellies, jams, pies or into the guava jelly paste. Propagated by seed, air layer or grafting. See Guava
PSIDIUM GUINEENSE - Araca, Brazilian guava
This small evergreen tree is from tropical South America and doesn't do well in sandy soil. The small, yellow fruit with many seeds is smaller than the common guava and too bitter or resinous to be palatable. Propagated by seed.
PSIDIUM LITTORALE - Strawberry guava,
Cattley guava
This excellent landscape shrub, native to Brazil, has shiny, deep-green leaves, reddish when young. Two varieties are popular,the red one has 1½" round, red fruit with a sweet to subacid flavor while the yellow one has larger and sweeter fruit,both are eaten fresh or used in jelly. Propagated by seed, cutting or air layer. See Strawberry Guava
PSIDIUM MICROPHYLLUM - Puerto Rican Guava
This guava grows well but is not popular because the fruit is very sour.

PSOPHOCARPUS TETRAGONOLOBUS See Winged Bean

PSORALEA ESCULENTA - Breadroot, Prairie Potato, Indian Turnip

PUERARIA LOBATA - Kudzu Vine

PUERTO RICO

  • Chironja, a Natural Orangelo. By Rick Parkhurst. 1982 #1, p 13
  • More Acerolas Than You Can Eat. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1978 #4, pp 13-15

PULASAN

  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45

PUMMELO

  • Editor's Mailbag. Pummelo. 1982 #2, pp 5-6
  • Notes on Some Unusual Citrus Varieties. By Orton H. Englehart. 1971 #2, pp 4-6

PUNICA GRANATUM - Pomegranate
A small, rounded, sometimes deciduous bush tree with stiff slender branches which can be spiny, red-brown bark turning to grey and beautiful deep orange flowers that bloom over an extended period. The round, orange fruit has a leathery skin surrounding chambers with many seeds covered with a red-juiced transparent pulp. It is eaten fresh and used to make juice or jelly. The rind of the unripe fruit, as well as the flowers, yields a dye. Propagated by cutting or seed (not true to seed). See Pomegranate

PUNICA GRANATUM VAR NANA - Dwarf Pomegranate

PURPLE MOMBIN

  • Anacardiaceae: Lacquer Mastic and Poison Ivy. By John F. Donan. 1986 YB, pp 1-9

PURPLE PASSION FRUIT See Passiflora

PYRUS COMMUNIS See Pear

PYRUS CYDONIA - Smyrna Quince

PYRUS PASHIA - Wild Himalayan Pear

PYRUS PYRIFOLIA See Asian Pear


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