Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

Seed Bank

Fruit Specialists (Q & A)

CRFG Member Nurseries and Fruit Sources

Tidbits of Info

 

CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - H

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HABBEL - Juniperus drupacea

HALLERIA LUCIDA See African Honeysuckle

HANDBOOKS, MANUALS

  • Book Review: Handbook on Fruit Trees and Shrubs. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 12
  • Book Review: Manual of Tropical and Subtropical Fruit. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, pp 12-13

HANCORNIA SPECIOSA - Mangaba
A medium size tree from Brazil with fruit the size of a plum, red with thin skin and sweet flesh containing one seed. Propagated by seed.
HARPEPHYLLUM CAFFRUM - Kaffir Plum
A South African small tree, very ornamental, branches are brittle in heavy winds. It flowers and fruits from summer to fall. The fruit are red about an inch long, thin skin and sweet flesh. Grown in Florida and Southern California. It is propagated by seed.

HAWAII

  • Book Review: Composition of Hawaii, Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 12
  • Book Review: Majesty, the Exceptional Trees of Hawaii. Reviewed by John F. Swift. 1983 #2, p 28
  • Choosing a Variety of Papayas (Carica papaya L.) for Export to Europe. By A. Shai. 1982 YB, pp 63-65
  • CRFG Trip to Hawaii. By Robert Chambers. 1982 #4, pp 10-14
  • Kauai Hai. By Don and Marlene Sanderson. 1989 #3, pp 12-14
  • New Bananas from Hawaii. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #3, p 11
  • Plants of Interest in Hawaii. By Peggy Winter. 1983 #3, pp 15-17
  • Seed Gathering in the Hawaiian Islands. By Steven Spangler. 1976 YB, pp 1-21-126

HAWTHORNS

  • Parsley Hawthorns. By Rosalie Osbaker. 1976 #1, p 12
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

HERBS AND SPICES

  • A Warning on Comfrey. By Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #3, p 12
  • From the Editor's Mailbag. 1984 #4, pp 4-5
  • Rebuttal to Danger of Eating Comfrey. By W.A. Sinnock. 1982 #3, p 4

HIBISCUS CANNABINUS See Kenaf


HIBISCUS ESCULENTUS - Okra
Originated in Africa where it was cultivated for many generations. The fruit was eaten cooked and the seeds were toasted, ground and used as a substitute for coffee. There are many selections of okra.
HIBISCUS MANIHOT - Edible Hibiscus
A shrub from the South Pacific that bears edible leaves when cooked. it grows well in warmer areas of the U.S.
HIBISCUS SABDARIFFA - Roselle
An African annual herbaceous shrub. It has a fruit whose calyxes are used to make drinks and preserves much like the cranberry. It is propagated by seeds. See Roselle

HICKORY NUT

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16
  • Selected Stone Fruits for the Bay Area. By Andrew Mariani. 1988 YB, pp 35-39

HICKSBEACHIA PINNATIFOLIA

  • Hicksbeachia, Macadamia Relative from the Rain Forest. By John M. Riley. 1980 #3, p 12
  • More on Other Macadamia Relatives. By Dick Endt. 1981 #3, p 11

HIGH BUSH CRANBERRIES See Viburnum Species

HILAMA - Annona diversifolia

HIPPOPHAE RHAMNOIDES See Sea Buckthorn

HISTORY, CRFG

  • About the CRFG Logo. 1985 #1, p 4
  • Anecdotal History. By Pat Sawyer. 1989 YB, pp 5-6
  • Annual Report. 1987 YB, pp 45-66
  • Biggest Meeting So Far. 1983 #1, pp 9-12
  • Board of Directors. 1987 J, p 76
  • Chapter Charter. 1989 YB, pp 49-50
  • Chapters and Chapter Information. 1989 YB, pp 47-48
  • Comments on This and That. By William T. Drysdale. 1975 #3, pp 14-16
  • Cookbook. By Muriel Fisch. 1979 #2, p 6
  • CRFG, My Impressions and Thoughts. By Burt Fisch. 1979 #2, pp 17-18
  • CRFG Travel Possibilities. By Peggy Winter and Sharon Hull. 1979 #1, pp 24-25
  • Description of California Rare Fruit Growers. 1989. By C.T. Kennedy. 1989 YB, pp 3-5
  • Executive Director's Message. By Pat Sawyer. 1980 #4, p 23
  • Founders and Past Presidents; Board of Directors; Staff; Officers, etc. 1988 YB, pp 4-46; 1989 YB, pp 43-44
  • Future of the CRFG. By Paul H. Thomson. 1978 #2, p 4
  • Happy Birthday (1 Year). 1969 #4, p 3
  • History of CRFG. 1970 #1, pp 1-2
  • Increasing Nursery Stock. By Doug Richardson. 1979 #1, pp 16-17
  • Letter from John M. Riley. 1973 #2, p 1
  • Looking Forward to the 1980's. By Claude Sweet. 1980 #1 pp 3-4
  • New CRFG Publication... With Your Help. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1985 #2, pp 8-19
  • New Newsletter Editor. 1985 #2, p 2
  • President's Message 1989: the Year of Changes. 1989 YB, pp 42-43
  • Producing Plants for CRFG. By Tito Steere. 1982 #2, p 26
  • Quail Botanical Garden. By Harry Stillman. 1979 #1, p 22
  • Thanks to Peggy Winter. 1985 #1, p 3
  • To Claude Sweet: a Thank You. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #3, pp 8-9
  • Troubles. By Paul H. Thomson. 1977 #3, pp 3-5
  • Twenty Years of CRFG: How We Got Here. By C.T. Kennedy. 1988 YB, pp 2-17
  • Value of Monthly Gettogethers. By Jim Neitzel. 1978 YB, pp 63-65
  • We'll Miss You, Dick. 1986 #3, p 2
  • Welcome from the South. By Paul H. Thomson. 1969 #1, pp 2-3
  • Welcome to Members of the CRFG. By John M. Riley. 1969 #1, pp 1-2

HISTORY, PLANT

  • Avocado. By Donald W. Mitchell. 1979 YB, pp 14-16
  • Better Roots Through Chemistry. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1973 YB, pp 2-5
  • Book Review: Growing Unusual Fruit. Reviewed by John M. Riley. 1976 #3, pp 5-7
  • Book Review: the Book of Spices. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #4, p 25
  • The Carissa in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 YB, pp 73-81
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • Citrus Family. By John M. Riley. 1979 YB, pp 17-27
  • Evolution of Fruiting Plants. By John M. Riley. 1970 YB, pp 1-6
  • Feijoa Cultivation Expands in California. By J.F. Swift. 1984 YB, pp 44-46
  • The Fig Its Rise, Decline and Renaissance. By George E. Herrera Sr.. 1982 YB, pp 55-58
  • Genus Garcinia: the Mangosteen and Related Species. By Ottis Warren Barrett. 1978 YB, pp 66-72
  • Greening of the Future Part I. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #2, pp 16-20, 25
  • Jojoba Horticulture. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 YB, pp 98-162
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • My Favorite Fruit Tree - the Jujube. By Edward T. Hager M.D.. 1989 #2, pp 13-15
  • The Origin of Banana Varieties. By R.E. Coronel and F.N. Rivera. 1983 YB, pp 73-76
  • The Papaya and Its Relatives. By John M. Riley. 1976 YB, p 112
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • Plant Patents. By John C. Oberlin. 1977 YB, pp 9-11
  • Quince: Cydonia oblonga. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 YB, pp 50-69
  • Rare and Common Fruits: Conservation of Genetic Resources in Malaysia. By Bobby Tee. 1984 YB, pp 47-55
  • Revision of Asimina and Deeringothamus (Annonaceae). By Robert Kral. 1974 YB, pp 91-137
  • The Rose Apple. By Burton E. Fisch. 1976 YB, pp 1-00-111
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45
  • Scientists Trace Citrus Origins. By Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #1, p 13
  • Seed Gathering in the Hawaiian Islands. By Steven Spangler. 1976 YB, pp 1-21-126
  • Sources of Plants. 1973 #2, p 7
  • The Strawberry Tree and the Madrone. By Melita Israel. 1976 YB, pp 84-88
  • Welcome to Paradise: Trip to Tahiti. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 70-73
  • What Constitutes a Rare Fruit ? By Paul H. Thomson. 1969 #1, p 4

HOG PLUM See Yellow Mombin

HOLBOELLIA

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 96
  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

HOLBOELLIA LATIFOLIA See Holboellia

HONDURAS

  • Chelonocarpus, a New Section of the Genus Annona. By W. E. Safford. 1982 #3, pp 1-3, 28
  • Preparing the Fruit We Grow. By Jo Davis. 1982 #4, p 24

HONEY LOCUST

  • Honey Locust. By Ralph Kreider. 1981 #1, p 5

HONG KONG

  • Fruit Samples in Hong Kong and Bangkok, Thailand. By Louis Schlom. 1976 #3, pp 1-3

HORSE MANGO - Mangifera foetida

HORSERADISH TREE See Moringa


HOVENIA DULCIS - Chinese or Japanese Raisin Tree
A small to medium-sized dioecious tree from China and Japan. The fruit is a small dry capsule with a fleshy, sweet, edible pedicel. Grown for the swollen red stems of the fruit that are used for medicine and food, tasting somewhat like pears. The tree does well in warmer areas, standing 10°F. Propagated by seeds or root cuttings. See Raisin Tree

HUCKLEBERRIES

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

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