Fruit Facts

Plant/Tree Descriptions List

1969-1989 Publications

Seed Bank

Fruit Specialists (Q & A)

CRFG Member Nurseries and Fruit Sources

Tidbits of Info

 

CRFG Publications 1969-1989 Index - C

Back to B - Up to Main Index page - Forward to D


CACAO See Cocoa

CACHIMAN See Rollinia

CACTI

  • Cacti for Fruit. By Ian Hartland. 1971 #4, pp 12-14
  • Edible Fruited Cacti. By Helen Hegyi. 1971 YB, pp 39-50
  • Great New Blueberry Plant, the Cactus. By Peggy Winter. 1979 #4, pp 10-12
  • News from the Hills. By David Silber. 1988 #4, pp 5-7
  • Rare Fruits for the Water-saving Garden. By Alice Ramirez. 1988 J, pp 39-44
  • Thoughts from Ye Olde Ed. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 #3, pp 5-6
  • Wild Fruit of South Africa Part I. By Ian Hartland. 1975 #1, pp 13-16

CAIMITO

  • Caimito: Chrysophylliun Cainito. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, pp 37-38

CALABASH - Cresentia cujete

CALABURA See Panama Berry

CALAMONDIN

  • For the Beginner: Fruit and Nut Notes. By Ruby Law. 1986 #3, pp 13-14
  • Kalamansi: Citrus Mitus. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, p 40

CALIFORNIA BAY (Umbellulari californica) See Bay Trees


CAMELLIA SINENSIS - Tea
This plant can be a shrub or tree, 3-50', with dark glossy green leaves, cultivated in warm parts of E. and S. Asia. The processed young leaves yield commercial tea. Freshly picked leaves are boiled to make green tea; allowed to ferment, they produce black tea. The seeds yield an oil.

CAMIAS

  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, p 56

CANANGA ODORATA - Yang-yang, Ilang Ilang, Annona Asiatic
This tree is grown for its flowers, which are used as a fragrance for perfume. Grown in tropical America for shade and the perfume of its flowers. Flowers form a large star, having six yellow-green petals. The base of the flower has the glands from which the perfumed oil is extracted. The tree can be grown is protected areas. It freezes 26°F but will sucker back. See Yang-yang
CANARIUM ALBUM - Chinese Olive, Pak Laam
A native of China, Vietnam and the Philippines, this large tree bears a fruit valued for its pulp. It is preserved in either sweet or sour form and used as olives.
CANARIUM OVATUM - Pili Nut, Java Almond
A large, lovely tree native to the East Indies, it has buttresses and aerial roots and is cold tender. It bears triangular, spindle-like hard-shelled nuts with an almond flavor. The rich oily seeds are eaten both raw and roasted. The pulp of the fruit is also eaten. See Pili Nut

CANDONGO See Rollinia

CANE APPLE - Arbutus unedo

CANISTEL

  • CRFG in South America: an Unforgettable Tour. By Bob Chambers. 1981 #2, p 11
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1978 YB, pp 5-13

CAPE GOOSEBERRY

  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72
  • The Poha Berry or Husk Berry. By Orton H. Englehart. 1986 #2, p 29

CAPER

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

CAPPARIS SPINOSA See Caper

CAPULIN CHERRY (Prunus salicifolia) See Capulin

CAPULIN

  • A Journey to Vilcabamba the Sacred Valley of Ecuador. By Steven Spangler. 1981 #3, pp 4-17
  • Capulin (Prunus salicifolia, HBK.). By Wilson Popenoe. 1973 #1, pp 2-4
  • Capulin Cherry in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1977 #2, p 5
  • Capulin Cherry Pruning Experiment. By Wade Hampton Cornell. 1981 #3, p 9
  • Capulin Cherry Tree. By George Herrera. 1983 #4, p 5
  • Capulin in San Diego County. By Paul H. Thomson. 1973 #1, pp 4-6
  • CRFG in South America: an Unforgettable Tour. By Robert R. Chambers. 1981 #2, p 9
  • Grafting Capulin Cherries. By Joy Hofmann. 1982 #2, p 4
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Necessity of Keeping Records. By Paul H. Thomson. 1974 #2, pp 8-9
  • Panama Strawberry Tree Fruiting in So. California. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #4, p.26
  • Ratiles: Muntingia calabura. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, pp 43-44
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1978 YB, pp 5-13
  • Seedling is a Seedling. By Peggy Winter. 1982 #3, p 26
  • That Surprising Capulin Cherry. By Walter V. Jerris. 1988 #3, pp 3-5
  • The Capulin Cherry. By William Popenoe. 1976 YB, pp 98-99
  • Thoughts from Ye Olde Ed. By Paul H. Thomson. 1975 #3, pp 5-6
  • Winter in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1976 #2, p 10

CARAMBOLA

  • Fruits for San Francisco Bay Area. By Martin G. Blinder. 1972 #4, pp 6-7
  • News from the Hills. By David Silber. 1988 #4, pp 5-7
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, pp 54-55
  • Update from Palm Beach. By Tommy Reese. 1982 #2, pp 19-21
  • Fruited Carambola. By Rick Parkhurst. 1982 #1, p 4

CARICA PAPAYA - Papaya, (Paw Paw Australia), Tree Melon
Carica is a genus of about 20 species of evergreen trees native to tropical America. They all produce a acrid milky sap. Although described as a tree, the plant is a large herb or soft-wood tree, like the banana. Carica papaya contains an enzyme known as papain, present in the fruit, stem and leaves. The milky juice is extracted, dried and used as chewing gum, medicine (digestion problems), toothpaste and meat tenderizers. (Meat can be tenderized by wrapping it in a bruised papaya leaf before it is cooked.) The fruit size varies from 4 to 20" and from 2 to 20 pounds. The flesh is soft and juicy, orange-yellow or salmon pink, surrounding a cavity containing numerous brown-black pea-size seeds which can be used as a spice (some people chew them). Unripe papaya can be cooked as a vegetable. See Papaya

CARICA PENTAGONA See Babaco

CARICA PUBESCENS - Mountain Papaya

CARICA QUERCIFOLIA - Small fruited Papaya


CARISSA CARANDAS - Karanda
An Indian Shrub or small tree with a ¾" reddish berry, with 3 - 4 seeds per fruit. In India, it is used for pickles and preserves.
CARISSA EDULIS - Egyptian Carissa
This plant is much like the Carissa grandiflora but the fruit is a little smaller and rounder. The taste is similar, though many people prefer this fruit.
CARISSA MACROCARPA (C. grandflora) - Natal Plum
A South African shrub used as a hedge or free standing shrub because of its interestingly formed branches and shiny deep-green leaves, offset by white and pink flowers. The plant bears a 2" egg-shaped red fruit that exudes a white astringent latex unless fully ripe. The fruit can be eaten out-of-hand but does make good cranberry-like preserves. It is a salt tolerant plant. See Natal Plum

CAROB

  • Book Review: Cooking with Carob. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 11
  • Carob in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 YB, pp 61-102
  • Carob Pods. By Clement K. Quinn. 1973 #4, p 12
  • From the Editor's Mailbag. 1980 #4, pp 4-7
  • Frustrated Farmer. By Melita Israel 1973 #3, pp 6-8
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Home Utilization of Carob Pods. By Edwin C. Pohle. 1974 #1, p 8

CARYA ILLENOENSIS See Pecan

CARYA SPECIES See Hickory Nut

CASHEW

  • Anacardiaceae: Lacquer Mastic and Poison Ivy. By John F. Donan. 1986 YB, pp 1-9
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, p 57
  • Return to the Philippines. By John McIntyre, 1978 YB, pp 5-13
  • Subtropical Fruits and Nuts of Spain, Kenya and South Africa. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 #1, pp 6-13

CASIMIROA EDULIS - White Sapote
A medium sized tree from Mexico and Central American highlands, it is a member of the Rutaceae family, which contains the citrus. Although listed as an evergreen, it drops a number of leaves during the dormant or winter period. The flowers are small and green/white in short clusters in the axils of mature leaves or on leaf shoots. The 3-4" fruit has a thin green-to-yellow skin and soft, creamy-colored, very sweet pulp surrounding 2-5 seeds. The tree may have two crops a year, grows well in Southern California and Florida (freezes at about 26°F). Propagated by seeds (7-8 years for fruiting), grafted or airlayered. See White Sapote

CASIMIROA PUBESCENS

  • Casimiroa Pubescens; Relative of White Sapote. By John Archer. 1986 #2, p 31

CASIMIROA TETRAMERIA - Yellow Sapote,Wooly-Leaved Sapote
Similar to edulis, but more ornamental, having large wooly leaves. The edulis like fruit is sometimes bitter. See Yellow Sapote

CASSAVA

  • Manihot Esculenta. By Carmen Crandal. 1981 #4 p 4-5

CASSIA BARK TREE - Cinnamomum cassia

CASSIA MIMOSOIDES - Japanese Tea Bush

CASTANEA SPECIES See Chestnut

CATALINA CHERRY

  • Wild Fruit the United States. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #2, pp 6-7

CATTLEY GUAVA - Psidium cattleianum


CECROPIA PELTATA - Cecropia, Trumpet Tree, Indian Snakework
A West Indian native, fast-growing, short-lived tree which has large leaves 1' across. The sap yields a latex rubber. Young buds are eaten as a cooked vegetable. The fruit is cylindrical with soft, sweet flesh and many small seeds. The tree is propagated by seed.

CEDRELA SINENSIS

  • Nostalgic Memories of North China Fruits. By Albert Fei. 1971 #1, pp 5-7

CEIBA PENTANDRA - Kapok, Silk Cotton Tree
A large deciduous tree of East Indian origin, it grows well in warmer areas of Florida. It is known for the cotton-like fiber around the seeds which is used for flotation devices. Young leaves are cooked and eaten.

CELTIS LAEVIGATA - Mississippi Honeyberry


CERATONIA SILIQUA - Carob, St. John's Bread
Dioecious. This Mediterranean tree is adapted to the same range as the orange. It is slow growing, but needs little care once established. The fruits are thick leathery pods up to a foot long, containing seeds and sweet pulp (24-48% sugar), which ripen May to July. The pulp is edible raw or cooked. In the U.S., it is well known as a chocolate substitute. Legend says St. John ate the pods, thus the second common name. See Carob
CEREUS PERUVIANUS - Pitaya, Night-Blooming Cereus
This strange cactus looks like a series of giant ribbed sausages attached end to end. It grows in coastal areas and warmer areas of the U.S. It can reach a height of 50'. Showy flowers open at night. Fruit is reddish, 1½" in diameter with a sweet flavor. See Pitaya
CEREUS TRIANGULARIS
A cactus similar to C. peruvianus with very tasty brilliant red fruit. The flower is also night-blooming and should be hand pollinated as the insect pollinator of South America is not present in the U.S. Used as a climbing cactus and extensively as the base plant for grafted cactus sold in stores. Cuttings root easily. Freezes at about 24-26°F.

CERIMAN

  • Flowering and Fruiting of Monstera Deliciosa. By Gerald Tamblyn. 1976 YB, pp 90-91
  • Monstera Deliciosa. By Muriel Fisch. 1976 YB, p 89

CHAENOMELES SPECIOSA - Japanese Quince
A low spreading shrub or small tree with spines that is quite hardy and very ornamental since it tends to flower in winter. The fruit is green-yellow and speckled, about 2 to 2½" around, with a characteristic pleasant quince odor.

CHARICHUELA - Rheedia macrophylla

CHAYA See Cnidoscolus chayamansa

CHAYOTE

  • Cultivating Rare Fruits in Riverside. By William T. Drysdale. 1976 #2, pp 6-9
  • Frustrated Farmer. By Melita Israel. 1973 #3, pp 6-8
  • Know Your Microclimate. By Mary Frances Stewart. 1972 #1, pp 8-9
  • Notes from our Members. 1976 #1, p 12

CHE

  • Che a Little Known Fruit. By George M. Darrow. 1970 #4, pp 1-2
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • On Mulched Basins and Mexican Limes. By Washington McIntyre. 1972 #4, pp 8-9

CHELONOCARPUS

  • Chelonocarpus: a New Section of the Genus Annona. By W.E. Safford. 1982 #3, pp 1-3, 28

CHEMICALS

  • Better Roots Through Chemistry. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1973 YB, pp 2-5
  • Chemical Weed Control in Banana. By C.L. Chia and R.K. Nishimoto. 1988 J, pp 28-32
  • Fewer Leaves Mean More Fruit. By Lynn Yarris. 1983 #4, pp 33-34
  • Growing Rare Fruit from Seed. By John M. Riley. 1981 YB, pp 1-47
  • Keeping California Clean. By Peggy Winter. 1982 #2, p 27
  • Marketing Opportunities for Subtropical or Unusual Fruits. By Claude Sweet. 1986 #1, pp 9-10
  • Scientific and Technical Literature. By MaryLouise Gurley. 1980 #4, p 11

CHENOPODIUM QUINOA See Quinoa

CHERIMOYA

  • A Journey to Vilcabamba - the Sacred Valley of Ecuador. By Steven Spangler. 1981 #3, pp 14-17
  • Alternative Method for Cherimoya Flower Propagation. By Bob Holzinger. 1987 #3, p 9
  • Big Cherimoya Tasteoff. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #2, pp 13-15
  • Bits & Pieces: Cherimoyas in Maui. By Peggy Winter. 1988 #3, pp 20-21
  • Bits & Pieces: Cherimoyas. By Peggy Winter. 1987 #1, pp 25-26
  • Cherimoya: a Heretic's Views. By Ron Kadish. 1985 #1, pp 5-9
  • Cherimoya Cultivar Identification Part I. a Tale Of Two Pierces. By N.C. Ellstrand and J.M. Lee. 1987 #1, pp 5-7
  • Cherimoya Cultivar Identification Part II. By N.C. Ellstrand, J.M. Lee, and M.L. Arpaia. 1989, #3 pp 8-9
  • Cherimoya Fruit Set: Differences Among Varieties, South Coast Field Station. By N.C. Ellstrand and J.M. Lee. 1986 #2, pp 18-19
  • Cherimoya in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1970 YB, pp 20-34
  • Cherimoya Misting Unsuccessful. By George F. Emerich. 1984 #2, pp 11-12
  • Cherimoya Report 1970-1971. By Louis Schlom. 1971 #1, p 11
  • Cherimoya Report 1971-72. By Louis Schlom. 1972 #2, pp 8-9
  • Cherimoya Riddle. By Jim Neitzel. 1982 #3, pp 8-12
  • Cherimoya Taste Off Results. By Bill Nelson. 1986 #2, pp 16-17
  • Cherimoya Tree North of San Francisco. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1983 #3, p 4
  • Cherimoyas in Carpinteria. By Tony and John Brown. 1972 YB, pp 2-6
  • Cherimoyas in Fallbrook. By Walter R. Beck. 1970 YB, pp 17-19
  • Chromosome Numbers in the Annonaceae. By Wray M. Bowden. 1974 YB, pp 73-81
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Differences in Seediness Among Seven Cherimoya Varieties. By N. C. Ellstrand and J. M. Lee. 1985 #4, pp 9-10
  • Down Under. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 22-31
  • Espaliering the Cherimoya. By Phil Clark, 1989 J, pp 1-4
  • Experiment in Cherimoya Grafting. By Rudy Haluza. 1983 #1, p 22
  • Experiments with Cherimoya Trees at Irvine. By Phil Clark. 1981 #2, p 15
  • For the Beginner: Future Growing Tips . By Ruby Law. 1988 #3, p 30
  • For the Beginner: Suggestions for New Gardeners. By Phil Clark. 1985 #2, pp 6-9
  • From the Editor's Mailbag. 1980 #1, pp 15-16; #2, pp 4-6; #4, pp 4-7
  • Gathering Pollen for Cherimoya Pollination. By Phil Clark. 1986 #2, pp 3-4
  • Gleanings: Cherimoyas. By Jim Neitzel. 1984 #1, pp 30-31
  • Growing Cherimoyas in Thousand Oaks. By Robert F. Vieth. 1978 #4, pp 6-7
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Isozymes/Cherimoya cv. Identification: Progress Report. By Norman C. Ellstrand and Janet M. Lee. 1984 #3, pp 8-9
  • Landscaping with Rare Fruits. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #2, pp 1-4
  • Miracle of Plant Propagation. By Phil Clark. 1982 #3, pp 1-4, 29
  • Miscellaneous Musings of a Misgiving Miscreant. By John Delevoryas. 1972 #2, pp 1-3
  • More Information on Diseases of the Cherimoya. By G.M. Sanewski. 1985 #1, p 11
  • Notes from Brown Ranch. By Peggy Winter. 1980 #4, p 6
  • Notes from Here and There on Cheri-moyas. By Rudy Haluza. 1983 YB, pp 37-39
  • Notes on Transplanting Cherimoya and Feijoa. By Washington McIntyre. 1970 #2, p 1
  • Pollinating Cherimoya. By Joseph Marconi. 1988 #4, pp 5-6
  • Pollination Techniques and Gibberellin Treatments for Cherimoya Fruit Set. By Wade Cornell. 1981 YB, pp 69-74
  • Practical Tips: Cherimoya Fruit Set. By Robert F. Allen. 1983 #3, p 14
  • Pruning and Pollinating the Cherimoya. By Orton H. Englehart. 1974 YB, pp 215-220
  • Questions and Answers. By Richard D. Tkachuck. 1985 #2, pp 10-11
  • Recipes: Cherimoya, 1983 YB, pp 41-43
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, pp 52-53
  • Some Experiments on Cherimoya Pollination. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1983 YB, pp 30-36
  • Some Observations on Cherimoyas. By Orton H. Englehart. 1969 #4, p 1
  • Subtropical Fruits and Nuts of Spain, Kenya and South Africa. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 #1, pp 6-13
  • The Biggest Meeting So Far. 1983 #1, p 10
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29
  • The Land of Cherimoya. By Curtis and Joy Hofmann. 1987 #1, p 9
  • The Russet Cherimoya of Guatemala. Talk by K. Maxwell. Reported by Melita Israel 1989, #3 pp 24-25
  • Using Hormone Sprays to Pollinate Cherimoya. By Amos Blumenfeld. 1980 #2, p 4
  • Varieties of Cherimoya. By John Brown. 1973 #4, pp 6-7
  • Verticillium Wilt on Cherimoyas. By Jonathan Brown. 1978 #3, p 27
  • Visit to Rudy Haluza's Ranch. By Ruby Law. 1985 #1, p 14
  • Where to Buy a Cherimoya Tree in Southern California. 1983 YB, p 40
  • Yes, Cherimoyas in Berkeley. By Katherine Pyle. 1987 #4, pp 8-10

CHERRY LAUREL See Wild Orange

CHERRY, CATALINA - Prunus lyonii

CHERRY

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, p 94
  • Capulin Cherry in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1977 #2, p 5
  • Capulin Cherry Pruning Experiment. By Wade Hampton Cornell. 1981 #3, p 9
  • Catalina Island Cherry. By Paul H. Thomson. 1977 #2, pp 6-7
  • Deciduous Fruit Varieties. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 YB, pp 20-40
  • Deciduous Fruits for Southern California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1971 #4, pp 4-8
  • Growing Blueberries, Cherries, Cherimoyas, Longans, Apples in Thousand Oaks. By Robert F. Vieth. 1978 #4, pp 6-7
  • Prunus caroliniana Cherry Laurel; Wild or Mock Orange. By Wilbur Wood. 1984 #1, p 19
  • Rare Fruits. But Not New. By C.T.Kennedy, 1985 YB, pp 40-51
  • That Surprising Capulin Cherry (Prunus salicifolia). By Walter V. Jerris. 1988 #3, pp 3-5

CHERRY OF THE RIO GRANDE

  • Cherry of the Rio Grande. By William T. Drysdale. 1971 YB, pp 26-38
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern Calif. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90

CHESTNUT

  • Chestnut in California. By Arlo E. Smith, 1975 #3, pp 7-9
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51

CHICKASAW PLUM - Prunus angustifolia

CHICLE TREE See Sapodilla

CHICO (SAPOTE, ZAPOTE) - Manilkara zapote See Sapodilla

CHILEAN GUAVA

  • Chilean Guava. By Grace Johns. 1975 #3, pp 13-14; 1984 YB, pp 23-24
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley, 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Growing Rare Fruit Trees in Containers. By John M. Riley. 1972 YB, pp 29-39
  • Myrtaceae: the Family of the Guava. By John F. Donan. 1984 YB, pp 5-17
  • Rare Fruit at UC Santa Cruz. By Kermit Carter. 1972 YB, p 112
  • Ugni Molinae (Myrtus ugni) the Chilean Guava. By John M. Riley. 1971 #2, pp 1-3; 1984 YB, pp 22-23

CHILL REQUIREMENTS

  • An Apple Experiment. By Marianne Friedman. 1987 #3, p 19
  • Chill Requirements 1989 YB, p 41
  • Deciduous Fruittree Varieties for Low Chill Areas. By Bob Fitzpatrick. 1988 YB, p 23
  • Differentiating Grafted from Seedling Kiwifruit Plants. By Roger Meyer. 1989 J, pp 38-39
  • Over Emphasis on Low Chill??? By Charles E. Estep, Sr.. 1988 #1, pp 6-10
  • Rating Deciduous Fruits. By Robert W. Fitzpatrick. 1980 #2, pp 11-15

CHINA

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, pp 92-97
  • About the Cover. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1987 #4, p 31
  • Dom Tangerine. By Louis Schlom. 1973 #3, p 11
  • Nostalgic Memories of North China Fruits. By Albert Fei, 1971 #1, pp 5-7
  • Sapindaceae Family. By Bill Louscher. 1980 YB, pp 41-45
  • Where We Are With Actinidia in California. By Roger Meyer, 1989 J, pp 25-28

CHINA CHESTNUT - Sterculia monosperma

CHINESE ARBUTUS - Myrica rubra

CHINESE JUJUBE See Jujube

CHINESE RAISIN TREE See Raisin Tree

CHOKE CHERRY

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

CHRYSOBALANUS ICACO - Cocoplum, Icaco
This native shrub or small tree of South Florida and the West Indies makes an extremely pretty light-green hedge. It will freeze at 26-27°F but return from the roots. The flowers are not showy nor are the fruits, which are about 1" in diameter and variously yellow, pink, red or black. They have a cotton-candy pulp surrounding the seed, which is edible raw or roasted and tastes similar to an almond. The fruit can be cooked and made into preserves.
CHRYSOBALANUS ICACO VAR PELLOCARPA - Everglade Cocoplum
A swampland version of the dry-land cocoplum. The fruit is yellow to purple.
CHRYSOPHYLLUM CAINITO - Caimito, Star Apple
This large, lovely tree of tropical American origin is used both as a landscape and fruiting tree. The leaves are glossy green on top and bronze beneath. It grows well in warm areas of Florida and has grown in San Diego, though it would prefer high humidity. The name "star apple" refers to the distribution of the seeds in the cut fruit. Skin color can be green, yellow or purple; shape is round. When ripe, flesh is melting, sweet and pleasantly flavored. Propagation by seeds (may never fruit) air-layer and grafting. See Caimito

CHRYSOPHYLLUM MAGALESMONTANUM See Stemberry


CHRYSOPHYLLUM OLIVIFORME - Satin - Leaf,
Damson Plum
This landscape tree, native to South Florida. Bahamas and the West Indies, has the appearance of the star apple except the leaves are more copper-colored on their underside. The chewy, purple, sweet, ¾" fruits are good fresh, similar to chewing gum.

CIKU See Sapodilla

CIMARRONA - Annona montana

CINNAMON BARK TREE - Cinnamomum cassia

CINNAMOMUM CAMPHORA - Camphor Tree

CINNAMOMUM LOUREIRII See Cinnamon

CINNAMOMUM ZEYLANICUM See Cinnamon

CINNAMON

  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, p 43

CIRUELA See Purple Mombin

CITRANGEDIN

  • Notes on the Kumquats. By Joseph W. Stephenson. 1971 #1, pp 2-5

CITRANGEQUAT

  • Notes on the Kumquats. By Joseph W. Stephenson. 1971 #1, pp 2-5

CITROFORTUNELLA MITIS - Calamondin, China Orange, Golden Lime
Native to China. An important citrus juice source in the Philippines, it has an upright growth habit, very shapely, almost thornless; highly productive and one of the cold-hardiest citrus. It makes an excellent ornamental, can be kept in a container or shaped by pruning to make a landscape plant. The small fruits, with red-orange rind and orange flesh, hold on the tree well. They are used for juice when not fully mature; when mature, skin becomes easily separated. See Calamondin

CITRUS AURANTIFOLIA See Lime

CITRUS AURANTIUM - Sour or Seville Orange


CITRUS / FORTUNELLA HYBRID - Limequat, Orangequat and Citrangequat
These three ornamental hybrids are a result of a breeding program sponsored by the USDA, to breed the cold hardiness of the kumquat into the other plants. The limequat is a key lime crossed with a kumquat; a good lime substitute and more cold hardy than its lime parent. The orangequat is a cross between the Meiwa kumquat and the Satsuma mandarin and produces a tasty kumquat-like fruit. The citrangequat is the result of a cross of kumquat and citrange (orange x trifoliate orange) and the fruit is very sour. All of the hybrids are prolific fruit producers, small trees good for containers and propagated by budding. See Limequat, Orangequat and Citrangequat

CITRUS BERGAMIA - Bergamot

CITRUS DEPRESSA - Shekwasha

CITRUS HYBRID See Lemonquat, Citrangedin

CITRUS JAMBHIRI - Rough Lemon

CITRUS LATIFOLIA - Tahiti Lime

CITRUS LIMONIA See Lemon

CITRUS MEDICA - Buddha's Hand

CITRUS MEYERI - Meyer Lemon


CITRUS MAXIMA (C. grandis) - Pummelo, Shaddock
A favorite in its original S.E. Asia, it is natural to describe the pummelo in relation to the grapefruit because they are closely related with slightly more frost sensitivity. The size of the fruit is reflected by its botanical name. It is the largest among citrus. It is generally round to pear-shaped with thick skin, firm flesh and a lower juice content than grapefruit. Because of the firm flesh, you do not eat pummelos the same way you eat grapefruit. Instead, you peel the fruit, segment it and shell the edible pulp vesicles out of their membrane. Many varieties exist with yellow, pink or deep red flesh and acid to sweet. See Pummelo
CITRUS RETICULATA X CITRUS MAXIMA - Tangelo
A cross between a mandarin and grapefruit or mandarin and pummelo. In many instances, the fruit will resemble one of its parents. For example, the Minneola, a cross of the Dancy mandarin and the Duncan grapefruit, has the color and flavor of the mandarin. In general, it will produce more if cross-pollinated with a mandarin or tangor.
CITRUS RETICULATA X CITRUS SINENSIS - Tangor
A cross of mandarin and orange, the Florida originated Temple is the most common variety. A small to medium tree with rich and spicy fruit. Ripens Dec. to March in Florida. It is believed that several natural mandarin-orange hybrids occur, such as Clementine and King.

CITRUS PARADISI See Grapefruit

CITRUS PARADISI X C. SINENSIS See Orangelo

CITRUS RETICULATA See Mandarins

CITRUS RETICULATA VAR AUSTERA - Rangpur Lime

CITRUS SINENSIS See Orange CITRUS

  • A Naturalist in Western China. By Ernest H. Wilson. 1976 YB, pp 92-93
  • Bark Grafting Citrus Fruit Trees. By Orton H. Englehart. 1971 #3, pp 2-4
  • Book Review: Citrus. Reviewed by Carol Frye Graham. 1982 #1, p 25
  • Book Review: In Search of the Golden Apple. Reviewed by Bob Chambers. 1983 #3, pp 12-13
  • Book Review: the Citrus Cook Book, Reviewed by Pat Sawyer. 1984 #2, p 25
  • Citrus Family. By John M. Riley. 1979 YB, pp 17-27
  • Citrus Notes. By Jim Neitzel. 1984 #2, p 6
  • Citrus Rating. By Bob Fitzpatrick. 1981 #2 p 20
  • Citrus: a New Book. By Cal Bream. 1980 #4, pp 15-16
  • Daylap: Citrus aurantifolia. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, pp 38-39
  • Freeze Damage Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner 1975 #2, p 11
  • Fruits Recommended by Specialists 1989 YB, pp 34-35
  • Gleanings: Citrus. Jim Neitzel 1982 #1, pp 22-24
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California By John M. Riley. By 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Growing Subtropical Fruits Down Under. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 #3, pp 20-24
  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, pp 47-48
  • Kalamansi: Citrus mitus. By John McIntyre, Jr.. 1977 YB, p 40
  • New Sources of Cold Hardiness for Citrus Breeding. By R.Young, C. Barrett, C.J. Hearn, D. Hutchinson. 1983 #3, p 25
  • Notes on Some Unusual Citrus Varieties. By Orton H. Englehart. 1971 #2, pp 4-6
  • Orangery a Citrus Nursery. By the Stephensons. 1973 #3, p 3
  • Questions and Answers. 1985 #3, pp 19-20
  • Rare Fruit at UC Santa Cruz. By Kermit Carter. 1972 YB, p 112
  • Scientists Trace Citrus Origins. By Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #1, p 13
  • Subtropical Fruits and Nuts of Spain, Kenya and South Africa. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 #1, pp 6-13
  • Suha: Citrus grandis. By John McIntyre, Jr., 1977 YB, pp 44-45
  • Tip-grafting of Citrus Seedlings. By Greg Johnson. 1989 #4, pp 26-27
  • Tracking Down Foreign Suppliers of Rare Fruits. By Ian Hartland. 1973 #3, pp 2-3
  • Winter in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1976 #2, p 10

CLAUSENA DENTATAM DULCIS - Indian Wampi


CLAUSENA LANSIUM - Wampi, Wampee
A citrus relative originating in South China. A small, thornless tree largely used as an ornamental. Will grow where citrus is grown. Fruits in clusters of 6-8 small round yellow fruits; the white flesh contains several jade green seeds and has a subacid flavor. Propagated by seed, cutting or air layer. See Wampi

CLIMATE

  • Adapting Apples to the Tropics. By Voon Boon Hoe. 1983 #4, pp 28-32
  • Babaco: New Fruit in New Zealand to Reach Commercial Production. By Dick J.W. Endt. 1981 YB, pp 48-52
  • Bananas in Ventura County, California. By Richard E. Watts. 1986 #1, pp 5-6
  • Capulin Cherry in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1977 #2, p 5
  • Climatic Adaptation of the Kiwi in New Zealand. By D.A. Slade. 1974 #2, pp 7-8
  • Climate Modification to Increase Heat. By Louis Lopyan. 1984 #4, pp 24-26
  • Coffee in California. By John M. Riley. 1976 #3, p 10
  • Cultivation of Granadillas in South Africa. By Frans A. Kuhne. 1975 YB, pp 56-70
  • Culture of Rare Fruits in the San Francisco Bay Area. By J. Garrin Fullington. 1974 #4, pp 3-6,
  • Down Under. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, p 23
  • Effect of Dry Winter on Fruit. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #2, pp 2-3
  • Frost Protection for Tropical Fruit Trees. By Pat C. Pendse. 1975 #4, pp 9-11
  • Fruits the Year Around. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #1, pp 1-4
  • Further Thoughts on Adjusting to our Drier Climate. By E. Hager, R. Watts and A. Ramirez. 1989 #4, pp 14-21
  • Gleanings: Warm Winter. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #4, pp 18-19
  • Good and Bad Days with the Kiwi Vine. By Raymond F. Vincent. 1974 #2, pp 5-7
  • Growing Avocados in a Desert Climate. By N.C. Moerland. 1980 #3, pp 9-11
  • Growing Rare Fruit in No. California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90
  • Growing Subtropical Fruits Down Under. By K.J. Nobbs. 1979 #3, pp 20-24
  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, pp 42-53
  • Kiwifruit: a Cost and Revenue Analysis. By Claude Sweet. 1978 YB, pp 14-56
  • Know Your Microclimate. By Mary Frances Stewart. 1972 #1, pp 8-9
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • More on the Muscat of Alexandria. By Warren J. Amstutz. 1977 #1, p 20
  • More on the Papaya. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #2, pp 13-14
  • Necessity of Keeping Records. By Paul H. Thomson. 1974 #2, pp 8-9
  • Newsletter of the Rare Fruit Council of Australia, Inc.. Reviewed by Ron Kadish. 1989 #1, pp 22-23
  • Notes on Growing Fruits in a Hostile Environment. By Dwayne Klotz. 1984 #4, pp 11-14
  • Papaya. By Brian Lievens. 1979 #2, pp 10-12
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Pineapple Guava. By Paul H. Thomson. 1984 YB, pp 28-31
  • Pistachio Climate Table. By Ron Kadish. 1982 #4, p 3
  • Preliminary Jojoba Report. By Betty Bretz. 1978 #4, pp 11-13
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, pp 52-69
  • Some Factors Influencing Cold Tolerance in Rare Fruits. By Paul Thomson. 1969 #2, pp 3-5
  • Studying Your Own Micro Climate. By Jim Neitzel. 1979 #4, pp 13-14
  • The Carissa in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 YB, pp 77-78
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • The Cultivation of Macadamia. By B.D. Spooner. 1983 YB, pp 44-46
  • The Paw Paw. By Paul H. Thomson. 1982 YB, pp 5-31
  • The Russet Cherimoya of Guatemala. Talk by K. Maxwell. Reported by Melita Israel 1989, #3 pp 24-25
  • The Strawberry Tree and the Madrone. By Melita Israel. 1976 YB, pp 85-86
  • To Deal with the Killerfreezing Weather. By Clell E. Bowman. 1975 #4, pp 5-7
  • Visit to a 200 Tree Papaya Grove. By Paul H. Thomson. 1978 #2, p 3
  • Welcome to Paradise: Trip to Tahiti. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 70-73
  • What's Going Wrong? or How to Diagnose Some Kiwi Problems. By Roger Meyer. 1989 J, pp 34-36
  • Wild Fruit of South Africa Part I. By Ian Hartland. 1975 #1, pp 13-16
  • Wild Fruits of Australia. By John M. Riley. 1982 YB, pp 68-75
  • Winter Damage to Rare Fruit Trees in Santa Clara Valley. By John M. Riley. 1969 #2, p 2

CNIDOSCOLUS CHAYAMANSA

  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, pp 42-43

COCCOLOBA UVIFERA - Sea Grape
A native of Florida, used as a coastal area, landscape plant, it does well in areas of high salt and poor soil. The leaves are large and round; the fruit is grape sized, with woody, purple skin covering a thin purple flesh crowning a large seed. They are borne on stalks and ripen individually, falling off easily when picked. The musky sweet flavor is pleasant eaten fresh but best as jelly. Propagated by seeds or air layers. See Sea Grape
COCCOLOBA SPECIES - Big Leaf Sea Grape
Similar in growth habits to the native sea grape with the exception of its large disc-form leaves, it is often used as a tropical landscape or container plant and can be shaped into a tree.

COCOA

  • Book Review: Cacao. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 12
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, p 58

COCONA

  • Cocona: Solanum hyporhodium. By Joseph L. Fennell. 1983 #4, pp 17-19
  • Solana: Fruit of the Future. By John M. Riley. 1983 YB, pp 47-72

COCONUT

  • Recipes: the Coconut. 1971 YB, pp 110-116
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, pp 58-60

COCOS NUCIFERA - Coconut Palm
This palm has a leaning slender trunk and a heavy crown of pinnate foliage. It prefers sunshine, tolerates salt, and in warm areas, is used extensively as a landscape plant. It will freeze at 29°F, though some have been known to survive 25°F. There are strains that can be selected for specific purposes, such as the 'Dwarf golden' with its bright little fruit or the 'Dwarf green' whose fruit are vivid green at maturity. Propagated by seed which is set into the earth about its depth.
COFFEA ARABICA - Arabian Coffee
A relative of the gardenia and Ixora, it is an attractive shrub with glossy evergreen leaves. It prefers light shade, is hardy to 28°F and can be used as a potted specimen, though some varieties grow into large trees. The flowers are white, star-like, fragrant, in axillary clusters which appear in the spring. The fruit are red when ripe, in the fall, with a sweet pulp surrounding the bean. See Coffee

COFFEE BERRY - Rhamnus californica

COFFEE PLUM See Rukam

COFFEE, ROBUSTA - Coffea canephora

COFFEE

  • Bits & Pieces: Coffee Tree. By Peggy Winter. 1986 #2, pp 27-28
  • Coffee in California. By John M. Riley. 1976 #3, p 10
  • Coffee Tree in Folger's Commercial. By Peggy Winter. 1984 #3, pp 5-6
  • For the Beginner: Fruit and Nut Notes. By Ruby Law. 1986 #3, pp 13-14
  • Home Grown Coffee. By Wilbur Wood. 1984 #1, p 24
  • How to Use Your Coffee Berries. By Curtis Hofmann. 1987 #2, pp 17-18
  • Kentucky Coffee Tree. By Wilbur G. Wood. 1981 #4, p 20
  • Rare Fruits in Coastal San Diego. By David B. Lloyd. 1975 #3, pp 1-5
  • Remembered Fruits of the Philippines. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1976 YB, p 60

COLD TOLERANCES

  • Are Light Freezes That Important?. By William F. Whitman. 1985 #3, p 15
  • Bits & Pieces. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #1, pp 25-26
  • Cold in Conroe, Texas. By W.B. Etheridge. 1982 #2, p 4
  • Cold in Pico Rivera. By Juan Munoz. 1982 #2, p 7
  • Farthest North Paw Paw. By Ernestine Lamouraux. 1977 #1, pp 18-20
  • Freeze Damage Marina Del Rey. By Lee Molho. 1975 #2, p 11
  • Freeze Damage Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1975 #2, p 11
  • Frost Report from Upland. By Pat Weissleader. 1985 #2, p 19
  • Fruit List for Colder Area Experimenters. By Mark Albert. 1983 #4, pp 11-13
  • Idea Box: Varmint Control; Measuring Chill; Cracking Macadamia Nuts. By John F. Donan. 1985 #1, pp 13-14
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Macadamias: a Basic Understanding. Talk by T. Cooper. Reported by Melita Israel. 1989 #1, pp 28-30
  • Monitoring Plants for Cold Hardiness. By John H. Tashjian. 1981 #4, pp 20-21
  • New Sources of Cold Hardiness for Citrus Breeding. By R. Young, C. Barrett, C.J. Hearn, D. Hutchinson. 1983 #3, p 25
  • Reevaluating Cold Hardiness of Certain Tropical Fruit Trees. By Henry Dawes. 1979 YB, pp 46-49
  • Some Factors Influencing Cold Tolerance in Rare Fruits. By Paul H. Thomson. 1969 #2, pp 3-5; 1979 YB, pp 34-45
  • The Pitanga: Home Use and Potential Commercial Applications. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #1, pp 5-9
  • Thermometer Shelter to Get Accurate Readings. By Dwayne Klotz. 1985 #1, pp 18-19
  • Tree Tomato and Mango Hardiness. By Clell E. Bowman. 1976 #2, pp 10-11
  • Winter Damage to Rare Fruit Trees in Santa Clara Valley. By John M. Riley. 1969 #2, p 2
  • Winter Freeze. By Burt Fisch. 1979 YB, pp 28-32
  • Winter in Santa Cruz. By Andrew P. Werner. 1976 #2, p 10

COLA NITIDA - Kola Nut, Goora Nut
A tropical African relative of the cocoa tree. Grows well in protected areas of South Florida. A handsome tree, to 40', bears leathery pods, whose seeds are the kola "nuts" famous for their role in Coca Cola and other drinks. The nuts are chewed in Africa. They supposedly improve the flavor of food. Slightly bitter (water drunk afterwards makes them very sweet). Propagated by seed, individually in final container as they do not transplant well.

COLOCARPUM SAPOTA See Mamey Sapote

COLOCASIA ESCULENTA - Taro, Dasheen, Eddo, Kalo, Dalo

COLOMBIAN WALNUT - Juglans colombensis

COLOMBIAN WILD CHERRY - Prunus capuli

COLOMBIA

  • Rare Fruit in Colombia. By Catherine French Chaparro. 1976 #3, p 4

COMPOST

  • Abstract: 20th Anniversary Meeting: Soil Management Problems Solutions. By Sherl Hopkins. 1988 #4, p 38
  • Composting. By Eph Konigsberg. 1987 YB, pp 18-21
  • Idea Box: Three Ideas for Garden Supports. By John F. Donan. 1986 #1, pp 19-20
  • It's Not Nice to Waste Mother Nature. By Alice Estep. 1987 #3, pp 17-18
  • Materials for an Acid Compost. By Bruno W. Bell. 1974 #3, p 7
  • Seaweed and the Garden. By Bargyla Rateaver. 1978 #1, pp 5-9

COMPUTERS

  • Computer Assistance in Rare Fruit Research. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1977 YB, pp 46-50
  • Computer Exchange for CRFG Members. 1985 #1, p 29
  • Data for Computer Bulletin Boards. By Leo Manuel. 1984 #2, p 24
  • The Computer and the Gardener. 1985 #3, p 29

CONCH APPLE - Passiflora maliformus


CONOPHARYNGIA ELEGANS - Toad Tree
This tropical tree, which grows well in southern or coastal parts of Florida, can stand small amounts of cold weather, drought and requires minimal care. A handsome plant with ribbed leaves, it produces a fruit looking somewhat like a toad with a carrot-like taste.

CONTAINER PLANTING

  • Container Culture. By William L. Nelson. 1982 YB, pp 47-49
  • Evaluation of Fruit: a Score Card. By C.A. Schroeder. 1986 #4, pp 12-15
  • Fruit Thinning. By Eph Konigsberg. 1987 YB, pp 24-25
  • Gleanings: Leo Manuel's Dwarf Fruit Garden. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #3, p 23
  • Greening of the Future. Conclusion. By Noel Vietmeyer. 1980 #4, pp 17-22
  • Growing Fruits from Seeds. By Rosalie Osbaker. 1977 #4, pp 2-4
  • Growing in Containers; Germinating Seeds. By John F. Donan. 1985 #2, pp 20-21
  • Growing Rare Fruit Trees in Containers. By John M. Riley. 1972 YB, pp 29-39
  • Growing Tropical and Subtropical Plants in Containers. By Walter Jerris. 1985 #4, pp 24-26
  • Kiwi Plants in a Container? By Roger Meyer. 1989 J, pp 29-31
  • Passionfruit the World Over. By Muriel B. Fisch. 1975 YB, pp 13-55
  • Rare Fruit Trees as House Trees And Why Not? By Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 22
  • Research Corner. By John Riley. 1983 #2, p 27
  • Reviewing Casimiroa Edulis. By Orton H. Englehart. 1977 YB, pp 35-36
  • The Carissa in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 YB, pp 78-79
  • The Chestnut. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1976 YB, pp 15-51
  • The Pitanga: Home Use and Potential Commercial Applications. By Walter V. Jerris. 1989 #1, pp 5-9

COOKBOOKS

  • Bits & Pieces. By Peggy Winter. 1985 #1, pp 25-26
  • Book Review: Cooking with Carob, Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 11
  • Book Review: Cooking with Exotic Fruit. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1981 #1, p 11
  • Book Review: Free Food from 27 Wild Edibles. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #1, p 21
  • Book Review: Maurice's Tropical Cookbook. Reviewed by Rick Parkhurst. 1983 #4, p 24
  • Book Review: Tropical Fruit Recipes, Rare and Exotic Fruits. Reviewed by Beth Nichols. 1983 #1, p 21
  • Book Review: Uncommon Fruits and Vegetables. By Elizabeth Schneider. Reviewed by Ron Kadish. 1988 #2, p 21
  • Book Reviews: Food; Bananas; Cooking with Exotic Fruits and Vegetables. Reviewed by Eph Konigsberg. 1988 #1, pp 23-24

COONTIE - Zamia integrifolia

CORDEUXIA EDULIS See Yeheb Nut

CORDIA NITIDA - West Indian Cherry

CORNELIAN CHERRY

  • Rare Fruit Sources. By Arlo Hale Smith. 1977 #1, pp 3-16

CORNUS KOUSA - Szechuan strawberry tree

CORNUS MAS See Cornelian Cherry

COROSOL - Rollinia emarginata

CORYLUS AMERICANA - Hazelnut

COSTA RICA

  • Bananas in Your Backyard. By Jim Neitzel. 1980 #4, p 25
  • Macadamia in California. By Paul H. Thomson. 1980 YB, pp 46-109
  • Plants That Shouldn't Be Thriving . . . But Are. By Peggy Winter. 1981 #1, p 14

COUEPIA POLYANDRA - Olosapo
A small to medium evergreen tree from Central America, it has a dried-out look due to stiff olive-green leaves. It bears elliptical greenish fruit which look like dill pickles hanging from branches. The flesh is soft and sweet but the pulp is semi-dry and like egg-yolk in consistency. Propagated by seed.
COUROUPITA GUIANENSIS - Cannon-ball Tree
A large deciduous tree, popular in South America and West Indies, it is a curiosity in the warmer areas of Florida and is propagated by seed. The fruits are 6-8" across, round, hard and brown, hence the common name. The white pulp is ill-smelling when ripe and contains many seeds but has a grape or wine-like flavor, slightly acid, which is edible.

CRABAPPLE, AMERICAN - Malus augustifolia, M. conoraria

CRABAPPLE, EUROPEAN - Malus seiboldi

CRABAPPLE, OREGON - Malus fusca

CRABAPPLE

  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB, pp 67-90

CRANBERRY - Vaccinium macrocarpon

CRATAEGUS AESTIVALIS See Mayhaw


CRATAEGUS AZAROLUS - Azarole, Medlar
Thought to have originated in the Orient, it is found throughout the Mediterranean as hedges, woods or sometimes as a solitary planting. It is an arid type plant requiring little care or water once established and is a favorite for flower arrangements whether in the blossom or fruiting stage. The fruit is similar to other hawthornes. ½ to ¾" in diameter, consisting of a group of nut-like carpels surrounded by a mealy, fragrant, sugary yet acid flesh, described as apple-like and covered with a orange-red to yellow skin. See Medlar

CRATAEGUS PINNATIFIDA

  • Additional Comments on Crataegus. By Paul H. Thomson. 1976 #4, pp 6-7
  • Growing Rare Fruit in Northern California. By John M. Riley. 1973 YB,pp 67-90
  • Nostalgic Memories of North China Fruits. By Albert Fei. 1971 #1, pp 5-7
  • On Mulberries and Hawthorns. By Arlo H. Smith. 1976 #4, p 6

CREEPING BLUEBERRY - Vaccinium crassifolium

CRFG MEETINGS

  • December 1973 Third Annual Get Together (grove tours). By Helen Hegyi. 1973 #4, pp 1-4
  • Dr. Lois James Addresses December General Meeting. By Jim Neitzel. 1981 #1, pp 24-25
  • Winter Tour and Plant Sale. By John McIntyre Jr.. 1980 #1, pp 5-7
  • Two Scholars at the CRFG Meeting. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1980 #3 pp 13-14, 21-22
  • The Annual Scion Exchange Takes to the Road. By C.T. Kennedy. 1988 #4, pp 8-13
  • President's Letter 1989 #3, pp 2-3

CUBAN SPINAACH - Montia perfoliata

CUCUMIS METULIFERUS - African horned cucumber

CUDRANIA TRICUSPIDATA See Che

CULTIVATION

  • Introducing the Actinidia. By Clytia M. Chambers. 1989 J, pp 20-21
  • The Cherimoya. By Miguel Cervantes Gomez. 1983 YB, pp 5-29
  • The Cultivation of Macadamia. By B.D. Spooner. 1983 YB, pp 44-46

CURCURBITA PICIFOLIA See Zambo

CURRANT - Ribes sativum

CURRANT TOMATO - Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium

CURRY LEAF TREE

  • Dwarf Fruit Trees. 1981 #2, p 5
  • Herb Trees for Warm Climates. By Robert E. Bond. 1989 J, p 48

CUSTARD APPLE - Annona reticulata

CYDONIA OBLONGA See Quince


CYNOMETRA CAULIFLORA - Namnam, Nam Nam
A small tree from Southeast Asia, it carries a fleshy pod 2-4" long, shaped like a kidney. It has several crops a year, is slow growing and propagated by seed. The pulp is subacid and contains one seed.
CYPHOMANDRA BETACEA - Tamarillo, Tree Tomato
An erect, fast-growing, South American evergreen shrub with fleshy, cordate, ornate leaves that have an unpleasant scent. It is shallow-rooted, susceptible to nematodes and requires rich, moist, well-drained soil. Heavy mulching is recommended to protect the easily damaged roots. The fruit is a many-seeded berry, egg-shaped, two-celled like tomatoes and about 2-3" long. It is treated like a tomato, cooked or eaten raw. Propagated by seed or cutting. See Tamarillo

CYPHOMANDRA FRAGRANS

  • Cyphomandra Fragrans. By John M. Riley. 1984 #4, p 28

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